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 You are in:  Special Report: 1999: 07/99: The moon landing
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Friday, 31 May, 2002, 09:44 GMT 10:44 UK
THE MOON LANDING


Earth seen from Moon The legacy of Project Apollo
When Apollo 11 returned to Earth, President Nixon said "It's all over". The missions were scaled down - and Moon exploration was never the same again.
Charlie Duke on the moon The story from Mission Control
The man who talked Aldrin and Armstrong down, Charlie Duke, talks to BBC News Online about his thoughts and fears, and about his own moonwalk on Apollo 16.
Apollo 11 touches down on the Moon The Eagle has Landed
With one giant leap for mankind, Neil Armstrong became the first man to walk on the moon. It was 20th July 1969.
The race to the moon
The landing of the first man on the moon was part of a fierce competition between the United States and the Soviet Union that some called "the moral alternative to war".
Walking on the moon
Armstrong and Aldrin spent several hours exploring the moon: they described the scene that greeted them as "magnificent desolation".
The Moon Landing
30 years ago, Apollo 11 made history by landing the first man on the moon. Space exploration was never to be the same again.
Revealing the Moon's secrets
The Apollo missions revealed more than ever known before about the Moon's origins, bringing back several hundred kilos of moon rock and dust.