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General Pervez Musharraf at the UN summit
"Pakistan stands for peace and is prepared to take bold initiative ...through a dialogue with India"
 real 56k

KN Mallik, political analyst
"[This is about] India-US relations... not India-Pakistan relations"
 real 56k

Thursday, 7 September, 2000, 07:45 GMT 08:45 UK
Musharraf seeks UN Kashmir role
Pakistan soldiers doing a mock-exercise
General Musharraf: South Asia is heavily militarised
Pakistan's military ruler has sought the intervention of the United Nations Security Council to resolve the long-standing dispute with India over Kashmir.

Making his first appearance before the UN General Assembly, General Pervez Musharraf said Kashmir was the root cause of tension in South Asia and accused India of intransigence in resolving the issue peacefully.


We also seek a South Asia free from all nuclear weapons

General Pervez Musharraf
"When one party to a dispute is intransigent in rejecting the use of peaceful means, the Security Council is empowered to act," he said.

General Musharraf, who assumed power in a military coup last October, also reiterated his offer of talks with India "at any level, at any time, anywhere".

"We desire a no-war pact. We are ready for a mutual reduction of forces, and we also seek a South Asia free from all nuclear weapons," he said.

India has refused to talk to Pakistan until it stops what India says is its support for the armed insurgency in Kashmir.

Pakistan says it only provides moral and diplomatic backing to the Kashmiri separatists.

Both countries tested nuclear devices in 1998, raising fears of a nuclear conflict in the region.

MAP
Indian Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee is expected to reach New York shortly for the UN summit, but he will not meet General Musharraf.

General Musharraf, who is under international pressure to restore democracy in Pakistan, said the coup was necessitated by a corrupt democratic regime.

He called for concerted action to prevent corrupt rulers hiding their wealth in secret bank accounts in other countries.

"The UN should call for banning the transfer of ill-gotten wealth and demand co-operation in tracing and repatriating such funds," he said.

The UN summit in New York is being attended by more than 150 heads of state and governments.

The Indian prime minister is scheduled to make his address on Friday.

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06 Sep 00 | South Asia
Five killed in Kashmir clash
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