Languages
Page last updated at 15:05 GMT, Thursday, 13 May 2010 16:05 UK

Pakistan court acquits men accused of militant attacks

By Syed Shoaib Hasan
BBC News, Islamabad

Police by the site of Monday's Rawalpindi attack
Rawalpindi has been regularly hit by violence

A Pakistani court has acquitted nine men accused of planning two deadly attacks on security targets, including one which killed the army's top medic.

A suicide bomber killed Lt Gen Mushtaq Baig with seven others in February 2008. He is the most senior military official to be killed since 2001.

Just weeks earlier, several employees of Pakistan's intelligence agency were killed in a suicide attack on a bus.

But the judge said there was not enough evidence. The men pleaded not guilty.

The 2008 suicide bombings left 16 people dead and wounded dozens more.

"Due to lack of evidence, no charges can be proved against the accused," judge Malik Akram Awan said in the anti-terrorism court in Rawalpindi on Thursday.

But the court said the men would be held in "preventative custody" at home because they are still under investigation.

The public prosecutor, Bilal Ahmed, told the BBC they "produced several witnesses and lots of evidence."

Mr Ahmed said that those acquitted included the alleged ringleader, Dr Abdul Razzak, an employee at a local government hospital, who was charged in both cases.

The decision comes 10 days after another Pakistani court acquitted four men of being involved in the bombing of Islamabad's Marriott hotel in 2008.

This continues a trend in which dozens of suspects charged in high-profile militant attacks have recently been freed.

Their acquittal now raises serious questions about the government's ability to investigate and solve such high profile attacks.



Print Sponsor


RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

Copyright © 2019 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific