Languages
Page last updated at 12:10 GMT, Thursday, 11 September 2008 13:10 UK

Pakistan's counter-insurgency quandary

By Barbara Plett
BBC News, Mardan, North West Frontier Province

The residents of Sheikh Yasin camp are not celebrating the inauguration of Pakistan's new president.

Taheer, a farmer now resident in the Sheikh Yasin camp
The army's killing people because America gives it money to fight terrorists, so it has to show it's doing something
Taher, a farmer now resident in Sheikh Yasin camp

They jostle each other as they wait for hand-outs of bread and queuing for soup, ladled out from huge vats under a canvas tarpaulin crusty with flies.

More than 2,000 people have fled to the camp to escape an army bombing campaign against the local Taleban in the Bajaur tribal area near the Afghan border. More civilians were killed than militants, they say.

For many Pakistanis, this is what the "war on terror" has brought: displacement and death. There is resentment and anger.

Double game

Despite, or perhaps because of, the high price that Pakistan has paid since 9/11, there's no consensus in the country about how to confront Islamist militancy.

9/11: THE NEW FRONTIER
More coverage throughout the day on BBC World News and BBC World Service

Now with a new president and a relatively new government, once again questions are being raised about the country's counter-insurgency policy.

Pakistan's former military leader Pervez Musharraf swung between military offensives and peace talks with militants.

Neither worked, and the general, although a key American ally, was accused of playing a double game by maintaining links with the Taleban.

It's not clear if it will be any different under the new civilian President, Asif Zardari, who took the oath of office this week. During his party's short six months in government, it has also tried both war and peace.

But at his inaugural press conference, Mr Zardari seemed to signal a new line. He shared the podium with Hamid Karzai, the Afghan president who has accused Pakistan of harbouring and supporting the Taleban.

They pledged co-operation against the militants, something for which Washington has long been pressing.

'America's man'

"I think so far Mr Zardari has been more forthright and more articulate [than Musharraf] in his belief that the war on terror has to be fought with greater intensity and sincerity," says Tariq Fathimi, a former ambassador to the United States.

"He has also been very categorical in stating that the war on terror is something that's in the interest of Pakistan, and that must be something that pleases the Bush administration."

resident of Sheikh Yasin camp
For Sheikh Yasin residents, the 'war on terror' has brought only misery

But for many in Pakistan, his performance has only strengthened impressions that he's America's man, and that's a problem.

Most Pakistanis are opposed to their government's participation in what they call America's war. And a recent surge in US air strikes against suspected militant targets in Pakistan's border region has not helped the new government.

"It is making things rather impossible for us," says Rehman Malik, head of the Interior Ministry, "because when the people hear of an alien attack, nobody likes it, we're talking about the sovereignty of our country.

"So we are fighting our war... and now we are asking the international community to help us."

It's not just the people - Pakistan's army is also angry, and it's still the country's most powerful institution. Any new policy or approach by Asif Zardari would need its backing to be successful.

Analysts say the army is unsure about Mr Zardari but willing to work with him, especially if he can deliver clear parliamentary support for military action.

Pakistani soldiers in NWFP
The army is eager to get the government's support

That source of popular legitimacy was sorely lacking under the previous administration. But the US air strikes complicate the relationship with the government.

"Within the army there is strong thinking that we are being let down by the government if it doesn't respond," says retired General Talat Masood.

"Because then, what would the people of Pakistan think about the army, which is just allowing national sovereignty to be violated in such a gross manner?"

There's no doubt Pakistan is facing a huge problem of Islamic militancy. But many are convinced it can't tackle this if it's seen to be acting at America's behest.

"Probably the only way to reverse it is to initiate a parliamentary debate," says Zaffar Abbas, the Islamabad editor of Dawn Newspaper, "to have a home-grown policy to deal with militancy and religious extremism, which is somewhat de-linked from the American demand to have an international campaign against terrorism.

"Unless they are able to do it, it will be nearly impossible to deal with this menace of terrorism."

Asif Zardari may have signalled that he's willing to work closely with America. But as a democratically elected leader, he also says he'll be directed by parliament.

How he handles that is crucial. His challenge is to truly make this Pakistan's war.


RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

Copyright © 2019 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific