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Page last updated at 16:17 GMT, Tuesday, 13 May 2008 17:17 UK

Ferry sinks in Bangladesh storm

Bangladesh rescue workers carry a body to shore after ferry capsized on river Ghorautra , 13 may 2008
Scores are killed each year in ferry disasters in Bangladesh

At least 40 people have been killed after a ferry capsized during a storm in northern Bangladesh, officials say.

The ferry, carrying nearly 150 passengers, sank in the Ghorautura river, nearly 180km (115 miles) from the capital, Dhaka.

Reports said about 25 passengers swam ashore but others were feared trapped in the stricken boat.

Bangladesh frequently sees ferry accidents - typically blamed on unsafe, ageing boats and on overcrowding.

In February, at least 39 people died after a ferry collided with another vessel in Buriganga river near Dhaka and capsized.

A study on ferry safety has said that about 20,000 cargo and passenger vessels operate in Bangladesh, and about half of them fail to meet basic safety standards, or take on more than their legal quota of passengers.

The study asked the government to strengthen coast guard patrols, identify dangerous river crossings, enforce registration requirements and provide training for navigators and crew.

The government says that measures are being taken to improve safety on the waterways.




SEE ALSO
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Second ferry sinks in Bangladesh
17 May 05 |  South Asia
Bangladesh's ferry safety failures
20 Feb 05 |  South Asia
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Bangladesh ferry crash kills many
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