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Last Updated: Friday, 23 February 2007, 18:52 GMT
Five thousand at Indian wedding
Devyani Rana
Relatives say that Devyani Rana is lucky to be alive
The woman who found herself at the centre of Nepal's royal massacre in 2001 has wed in India in a ceremony attended by thousands of guests.

Devyani Rana married businessman Aishwarya Singh, the grandson of Indian Human Resources Minister Arjun Singh.

It was widely reported in Nepal that Crown Prince Dipendra shot eight members of his family because he had been forbidden from marrying Ms Rana.

Dipendra met her in 1989, and was said to have been immediately "smitten".

'Great and the good'

But the union was fiercely opposed by his parents, King Birendra and Queen Aishwarya.

The BBC's Anil Giri said it was a grand celebration with 5,000 dignitaries from India and all over the world attending.

Crown Prince Dipendra
The crown prince was reported to be mesmerised by Devyani Rana

The prime minister of India was there, as were nearly all the senior ministers in his government including Sonia Gandhi.

"Such a huge number of the great and the good do not congregate that often, and it's the most memorable event of my life, said Nepalese politician Udaya Shumsher Rana, who is a relative of the bride.

The two day ceremony - which culminated on Friday - was held at the house of the father of the bride, Pashupati Sumsher Rana, in Delhi.

It was a mixture of Indian and Nepalese traditions, with a group of Nepalese priests attending.

'Psychological toll'

In June 2001 a drunken Crown Prince Dipendra killed his parents and seven other royals before killing himself.

Ms Rana was not there at the time, but relatives say she was fortunate to have escaped with her life as she was a regular visitor to the palace.

"Devyani was no less a victim than the people who were actually killed. She was lucky to escape alive, but the psychological toll it took on her was very deep," her uncle told the BBC in 2002.

She fled Nepal immediately after the massacre and now works for the United Nations Development Programme. Recently she has been seriously ill with meningitis.


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