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Wednesday, 2 February, 2000, 14:30 GMT
Everest's 'new height' disputed

Mount Everest Mount Everest is now officially two metres higher


The Nepalese Government has refused to recognise a revised height for the world's highest peak, Mount Everest.

It said it was rejecting last year's findings by scientists from the United States that the mountain was two metres higher than previously thought.

The new "official" height was 8,850m - or 29,030 feet - an increase of roughly the height of a very tall man from the height which had been internationally agreed since 1954.

The measurement - carried out with state-of-the-art equipment by the National Geographic Society and scientists from Boston's Museum of Science - was adopted by the US National Geographic Society.

However the Nepalese ministry of land reforms and management rejected what it called "the new height theory about Mount Everest".

It said it had had conflicting reports from other scientists about the mountain's height.

"In light of all these facts, Nepal's government will continue to recognise the old height of Mount Everest [8,848m]", a statement said.

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