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Last Updated: Wednesday, 22 November 2006, 13:30 GMT
Press celebrates Nepal peace pact
Nepalese people sing and dance in a victory march
Nepalese take to the streets

Newspapers in Nepal have expressed pride and high hopes for the country after Tuesday's signing of a peace agreement between the government and Maoist rebels, marking the end of a decade of conflict.

While editorials speak of a "new destiny" and a "new era", papers caution that there is more work to be done to ensure that the peace will last, starting with the election of a constituent assembly.

But at least one paper thought such a goal would not be difficult to achieve now the violence is over.

EDITORIAL IN THE KATHMANDU POST

November 21, 2006 will be proudly remembered and celebrated by all Nepalis as a day that transformed the destiny of this great nation. We have set an example in conflict resolution for the whole world... If we are to set off into this brave new world of peace and prosperity, the political parties should hound out corruption, nepotism, favouritism and fight any politicisation of bureaucratic and non-governmental institutions... Let us all now commit ourselves to build a new Nepal.

EDITORIAL IN GORKHAPATRA

It is believed that this agreement will create an environment of total peace in the country, and reach the meaningful goal of political stability through the election of the constituent assembly. Amidst the undesirable political ups and downs of the past, people proved their power and mettle. The fight to gain back their rights must be remembered. It is the power of the people that has ended the longstanding politics of the gun and established the politics of thought.

COMMENTATOR IN EKANTIPUR

Nepalis have always hated dictatorial rule, wishing always to live in peace and freedom. But the irony was that the rulers of Nepal never gave them such an environment. The present agreement fittingly acknowledges that the seven parties and the Maoists do respect the people's aspirations for democracy, peace and progress expressed through repeated historic people's movements and struggles since 1951.

EDITORIAL IN KANTIPUR

The formal declaration of the end of conflict with the signing of a comprehensive peace pact between the government and the Communist Party of Nepal-Maoist has created a sense of security and goodwill among the citizens. It has created hope and gained the respect of the international community towards Nepal. Credit for this agreement goes to the government, the Maoists, political parties and civil society. The truce declared now can turn into permanent peace only when an open, competitive multiparty democratic system is established in Nepal.

EDITORIAL IN ANNAPURNA POST

With this accord, we have entered into a new era, an era of peace. Yet, the nation is still in transition. The mission to fully achieve the political desires of the Nepalese people is not over. There is the election of the constituent assembly ahead of us. When violence turns into peace, such a goal is not hard to achieve. Let us have faith in that.

FRONT-PAGE, BANNER HEADLINE IN THE HIMALAYAN TIMES

Die's cast: War's past, peace to last

CAPTION IN THE RISING NEPAL

Light at the end of conflict

BBC Monitoring selects and translates news from radio, television, press, news agencies and the internet from 150 countries in more than 70 languages. It is based in Caversham, UK, and has several bureaux abroad.




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