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Last Updated: Saturday, 18 March 2006, 16:27 GMT
Sex abuse Brits jailed in India
Duncan Grant arriving in India in 2005
Grant has been in custody since surrendering to the court last year
Two British men have been jailed for six years in India for sexually abusing boys at a homeless children's shelter in Mumbai (Bombay).

Charity worker Duncan Grant, 61, from London and former naval officer Allan Waters, 58, of Portchester, Hampshire, were found guilty of child sex abuse.

The pair were also fined 20,000 ($35,000) each. Both men will be lodging an appeal, their lawyer said.

The court heard boys as young as eight lived at the home set up by Grant.

The shelter's Indian manager William D'souza was found guilty of aiding and abetting the men and given three years.

The court also fined him 64 ($113).

"The judgement should go some way to ensure that India is wiped out from the map of people who indulge in sexual abuse of children," said judge PS Paranjape.

A committee would be formed to decide how the fines could be used to help the victims.

Corruption claims

An investigation began after police received a complaint from a 15-year-old boy about repeated sexual and physical abuse by the men. Four other boys made similar complaints.

A 2001 police report charged the men with sodomy and sexually abusing boys at the Anchorage shelter, which Grant set up in 1995 for around 90 boys aged eight to 18.

We are waiting to see the judge's reasoning for the verdicts before we decide whether they cause concern or not
Stephen Jakobi, Fair Trials Abroad

Grant, from Hampstead in north London, who also ran children's charities in Tanzania, was arrested in Dar es Salaam in 2004 on a warrant issued by Indian police.

He returned to London after being released on bail but has been in police custody since June 2005 after surrendering to the court on the advice of his lawyers.

Waters, who police said was a regular visitor to the home, was arrested at New York's JFK airport three years ago on an Interpol warrant and extradited to India.

The retired Royal Navy Lieutenant Commander was a "highly respected" officer at the Sea Cadet centre in Portsmouth, according to campaign group Fair Trials Abroad.

Its director Stephen Jakobi said the organisation had been monitoring the case.

"There were allegations and counter-allegations of corruption," he said.

"We did send a lawyer out there to observe the case and a report was submitted to the defence team and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

"We are now waiting to see the judge's reasoning for the verdicts before we decide whether they cause concern or not."

Sentences welcomed

Prosecutors told the court the men had betrayed the boys who respected them.

He said D'souza thrashed the boys in the shelter after they were abused, to prevent them from complaining to other social workers or the police.

What this case goes to show is the extreme lengths to which British nationals will go to abuse children
Christine Beddoe
Charity worker

The sentences have been welcomed by children's charities in the UK.

Dr Yug Mohit Chaudhry, a solicitor for Childline, which first began the investigation, welcomed the judgement.

He said he was pleased with the judge's ruling, particularly because child sex abuse in India was a low priority item and police investigation was "very poor".

Christine Beddoe, of charity End Child Prostitution, Pornography and Trafficking, said there was evidence the men were part of a much bigger network.

She said: "The organisation of this sort of abuse is despicable. What this case goes to show is the extreme lengths to which British nationals will go to abuse children."


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See one of the homes set up by Duncan Grant




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