[an error occurred while processing this directive]
BBC News
watch One-Minute World News
Languages
Last Updated: Saturday, 6 August 2005, 16:18 GMT 17:18 UK
Nuclear neighbours reach key deal
Manmohan Singh (left) and Pervez Musharraf
India and Pakistan have pledged closer dialogue
India and Pakistan have agreed to give each other advance notice of future nuclear missile tests, the two countries have announced.

The neighbours also said they would set up an emergency nuclear hotline between their foreign ministries.

The statement came after two day of talks aimed at reducing the risk of a nuclear war between the two neighbours.

The discussions, in the Indian capital Delhi, were the third of their kind since a peace process began last year.

"The two sides reached an understanding on the proposed agreement on pre-notification of flight testing of ballistic missiles," the statement said.

It said the hotline "to prevent misunderstandings and reduce risks relevant to nuclear issues" would be established in September 2005.

During nearly six decades of tensions, the two rivals have fought three wars.

'New maturity'

On Monday Pakistani and Indian officials are due to discuss confidence-building measures and the long-running dispute over Kashmir.

Correspondents say the talks are seen as an indication of a "new maturity" in relations between India and Pakistan.

Last year, the two countries agreed to try to resolve their problems through a more sustained dialogue.

But analysts say Pakistan is unhappy about the deal India reached with the US last month on civilian nuclear cooperation.

Meanwhile, India still wants Pakistan to take action to prevent attacks by militants in Indian-controlled Kashmir.

India says many of the militants have been armed and trained by Pakistan - an allegation which Pakistan denies.


BBC NEWS: VIDEO AND AUDIO
See representatives from the two countries meeting for talks



RELATED INTERNET LINKS:
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific