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Last Updated: Thursday, 24 March, 2005, 12:42 GMT
More bad weather hits Bangladesh
A new spate of bad weather has swept over Bangladesh, killing at least 30 people in the last two days, according to local officials.

It is now thought that as many as 80 people have died over four days as violent tropical storms hit southern, western and northern districts.

The worst affected area is Gaibandha district in the north, where a tornado on Sunday killed at least 54 people.

Hundreds of people were injured and many people were left homeless.

Reports say that people died because their boats capsized or because they were buried beneath uprooted trees or collapsed walls.

The heavy rain and hail - accompanied by lightning strikes and strong winds - also damaged homes and crops which were ready for harvest, officials said.

Power was disrupted in capital Dhaka, where some streets were flooded.

More storms likely

A number of domestic and international flights were delayed for hours or cancelled. Ferry owners have been advised to travel with extreme caution.

The BBC's Shahriar Karim in Dhaka says that each summer, tropical storms hit Bangladesh and kill hundreds of people.

Our correspondent says that the national meteorology office has forecast that storms may continue to hit many places.




SEE ALSO:
Deadly tornadoes hit Bangladesh
07 Oct 04 |  South Asia
UN warns of deaths in Bangladesh
20 Sep 04 |  South Asia
Dhaka floods prompt sewage fears
26 Jul 04 |  South Asia
Bangladesh prays for floods to ease
23 Jul 04 |  South Asia


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