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Last Updated: Monday, 19 September 2005, 17:43 GMT 18:43 UK
India plans anti-Maoist strategy
Maoists in India
Maoists want communist rule across a number of states
The Indian government has said it will tackle rising Maoist violence through better police coordination and poverty reduction plans.

The announcement follows a meeting in Delhi with chief ministers of states where Maoist rebels are active.

Earlier this month, Maoists in the states of Chhattisgarh and Jharkhand killed more than thirty people.

Maoists say they are fighting for more rights for indigenous people in at least five states.

Outlawed

The Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Chattisgarh have outlawed Maoist organisations, also known as Naxalites, but others including the eastern state of Orissa have indicated they are against such a move.

The Indian Home Minister, Shivraj Patil, who chaired the meeting, said the federal government will help set up joint regional task forces to share intelligence on Maoist activity across state borders.

Mr Patil said the government will spend nearly $366 million a year to modernise the police forces, the Associated Press news agency reports.

Thousands have died in Maoist campaigns across central and southern India in the past 30 years.

The rebels are pressing for the creation of a communist state comprising tribal areas in the states of Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, Orissa, Bihar and Chhattisgarh.

The Indian government believes that there may be 10,000 armed Maoist rebels in India, correspondents say.




SEE ALSO:
Indian state bans Maoist groups
05 Sep 05 |  South Asia
Indian landmine blast kills 24
04 Sep 05 |  South Asia
India's Maoist revolutionaries
08 Apr 04 |  South Asia
Key Indian Maoist groups unite
08 Oct 04 |  South Asia
India rebels vow to fight on
20 Jun 03 |  South Asia


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