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Last Updated: Monday, 22 September, 2003, 15:14 GMT 16:14 UK
'Hambali's brother' held in Karachi
Pakistani officials say they believe a man they arrested in Karachi is the younger brother of Asian terror suspect Hambali.

Hambali
Hambali is alleged to have links to al-Qaeda

The man identified as Rusman Gunawan was arrested on the weekend along with 15 Malaysian and Indonesian students suspected of terrorist activities, Pakistani interior ministry spokesman Iftikhar Ahmad said.

Malaysia's deputy Prime Minister Abdullah Ahmad Badawi said the Pakistani government had identified the students from investigations carried out on Hambali.

"They found Hambali had contacts in the country and it was through his contacts that the authorities identified the students," he told correspondents, adding that Malaysia had appealed to send the Malaysian students home.

Hambali is believed to have been the operations chief for Jemaah Islamiah (JI) - a group allegedly linked to al-Qaeda and blamed for last year's Bali bombing and other attacks.

He was arrested in Thailand in August and is currently in US custody at an undisclosed location.

'Terrorists'

Hambali's real name is Riduan Isamuddin. Many Indonesians only use their given names, so family members often do not have the same surname.

Those arrested in Karachi were detained in raids on three Islamic schools in the city on Saturday, an Interior Ministry official said.

"The arrests were made in pursuance of our aim to interdict, to investigate terrorists and suspected terrorists in this case," Foreign Ministry Masood Khan told a news conference in the capital, Islamabad.

"These are suspected terrorists or people who have links with terrorists."

There are hundreds of foreign students studying in Karachi's Islamic seminaries.

The government has cracked down on them and many foreign students have been forced to leave because they did not have permission from their governments to study in Pakistan.



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