BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Urdu Hindi Pashto Bengali Tamil Nepali Sinhala
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: South Asia  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Sunday, 16 February, 2003, 14:28 GMT
Afghan teachers train for new year
A class of Afghan girls
Rebuilding education is no easy task

The Afghanistan Government and Unicef will this week begin a new training programme for teachers before they go back to the classroom to begin the new school year in March.

It is expected that as many as four million Afghan children will return to school, many of them to catch up on the education they missed out on during the rule of the Taleban.

Afghan women teachers
Women were not allowed to teach under the Taleban

The restrictions that the Taleban imposed on the country's education system left many teachers under-trained and unsupported. Women were denied the right to teach altogether.

More than 20,000 teachers will begin a new round of training.

For many of them it will be the first formal training they will receive.

New style teaching

The focus will be on new ways to teach Afghanistan's most widely used languages, Dari and Pashto, by using Afghan traditional folklore and stories.

There will also be an effort to get awareness of landmines and unexploded ordinance included in lessons.

Children account for many of the 300 deaths or injuries caused every month by mines in Afghanistan.

But delivering lessons is not always easy. In the first year of schooling since the fall of the Taleban a number of schools were destroyed in rocket or arson attacks.

An Afghan school girl
There is still resistance to sending girls to school

These acts are blamed on conservative elements within Afghan society, who remain opposed to the education of girls, which they see as a contradiction of Afghan values.

While many girls are encouraged to attend school in their early years, once they reach puberty many are taken back into the home.

But now the education sector is regarded as one area where the promise of nearly $5bn-worth of foreign aid has made a difference.

A spokesman for Unicef says improving the quality of education is one way to ensure girls keep coming back to school.


Rebuilding

Political uncertainty

Profiles

Issues

FACT FILE

IN DEPTH

FORUM

TALKING POINT
See also:

10 Nov 02 | South Asia
31 Oct 02 | South Asia
03 Oct 02 | South Asia
23 Mar 02 | South Asia
16 Mar 02 | Americas
17 Oct 02 | South Asia
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more South Asia stories are at the foot of the page.


 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more South Asia stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes