BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Urdu Hindi Pashto Bengali Tamil Nepali Sinhala
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
    You are in: South Asia  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
 Wednesday, 8 January, 2003, 10:31 GMT
Amnesty voices Kashmir rights fears
Indian border guards on the streets of Srinagar, Kashmir
Mufti Sayeed was urged to get tough by Delhi
Amnesty International has expressed fears that the new government of Indian-administered Kashmir is backtracking on pledges to probe human rights violations.

The organisation said that any policy of impunity for violations by the feared Special Operations Group (SOG) was ''unacceptable''.

The organisation is disappointed the government may be retreating from its commitment to uphold human rights

Amnesty International
Amnesty said it was ''disturbed by reports that the government is to break the promise... to investigate all reported cases of custodial killings and violations of human rights''.

Kashmir Chief Minister Mufti Mohammed Sayeed, who came to power in the November, had promised to curb the SOG.

However, in a speech on Monday, he said the notorious counter-insurgency police would simply be ''reoriented".

Reforms unclear

The SOG is made up of local policemen who have volunteered to work against Muslim rebels and has a bad reputation among Kashmiris, in particular for extortion.

Soldiers destroy a Kashmir building where militants were thought to be hiding
Tens of thousands have died in Kashmir since 1989
Correspondents say Mufti Sayeed seems to have altered his policy after some Delhi ministers accused him of being soft on militants.

He did not spell out on Monday what the SOG reforms would be.

Amnesty International criticised Mufti Sayeed for reportedly saying that an amnesty would be available to those who have perpetrated abuses.

It said: ''The organisation is disappointed that the government may be retreating from its commitment to uphold human rights.''

More than 35,000 people have died in Indian-controlled Kashmir since an anti-Indian rebellion began in 1989.

Click here fror background reports and analysis

Key stories

Eyewitness

BBC WORLD SERVICE
See also:

01 Jan 03 | South Asia
30 Dec 02 | South Asia
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more South Asia stories are at the foot of the page.


 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more South Asia stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes