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Tuesday, 19 November, 2002, 08:50 GMT
Thousands mourn executed Pakistani
Funeral of Aimal Kansi
The body was taken to a sports stadium in Quetta
Huge crowds in the Pakistani city of Quetta have been attending the funeral of Aimal Khan Kansi, who was executed in the United States on Friday.

Kansi, who is from Quetta, was executed for the murder of two US secret service officials outside the CIA headquarters near Washington in 1993.


I don't know who Kansi was, I only know that he was killed by America

Sadiq, 20, student

Many in the crowd chanted anti-American slogans and proclaimed Kansi a martyr.

Tight security was imposed for the funeral with police and anti-terrorism forces deployed in the city, which is close to the Afghan border.

The United States says it is braced for possible reprisals in response to the execution.

Draped in a green cloth, Kansi's body was taken to a sports stadium for a prayer service after which it was taken to his family graveyard for burial.

Kansi's relatives said that the family had wanted a quiet funeral, but there had been many requests from other people to attend.

Kansi, 38, was killed by lethal injection in Virginia for murdering two American CIA employees in 1993.

Emotions high

Thousands of people including tribal kinsmen, religious leaders, politicians and others converged on Quetta to attend the funeral.

Aimal Khan Kansi
Kansi's family had appealed for clemency
"Aimal Kansi's martyrdom has united Muslims against the United States," a cleric, Hussain Ahmed Sherodi, said.

"I don't know who Kansi was, I only know that he was killed by America," Sadiq, a 20-year-old student told AFP.

After the prayers, the coffin was carried in procession to his family graveyard, outside the city.

Black flags and banners fluttered throughout the city, many hoisted from shops whose owners have declared two days of mourning.

In the capital Islamabad, hardline Islamic members of Pakistan's newly elected parliament interrupted proceedings to hold a prayer.

Brought home

On Monday, thousands lined the streets of Quetta waving black flags and vowing to avenge Kansi's death as a convoy of around 700 cars accompanied the ambulance that carried his body from the airport to his home.


I have no regrets... I told the US that its officials would not be safe in their homes if it continues to target Palestinians

Aimal Kansi

The crowds also shouted slogans condemning Pakistan's President Pervez Musharraf as the convoy took two hours to complete what would normally be a 10-minute journey.

Kansi's brother, Hameedullah, who escorted the body said his brother had "lived like a brave man and he died with no regrets".

"His death will not help America. Hatred against the US will increase in the Muslim world."

Hameedullah said his brother had had no opportunity to contest his case properly and that he had been mistreated in prison.

Retaliation fear

The US State Department warned that the execution could lead to retaliation against Americans around the world.

Banners at Kansi funeral
The funeral turned into an anti-American protest
The governor of Virginia rejected last-minute calls for clemency issued by Kansi's family and the Pakistani Government.

Before his execution, Kansi told the BBC's Urdu service that he felt no remorse and that he carried out the attack to register his anger at American "anti-Muslim" policy in the Middle East.

Kansi shot CIA intelligence analyst Lansing Bennett, 66, and CIA agent Frank Darling, 28, outside CIA headquarters.

Three others were wounded.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Susannah Price reports from Islamabad
"The day passed off peacefully"
See also:

19 Nov 02 | South Asia
15 Nov 02 | South Asia
15 Nov 02 | South Asia
15 Nov 02 | South Asia
15 Nov 02 | South Asia
14 Nov 02 | Americas
14 Nov 02 | Americas
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