BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Urdu Hindi Pashto Bengali Tamil Nepali Sinhala
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: South Asia  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 12 November, 2002, 09:03 GMT
Kabul student protest turns bloody
Money changers in Kabul
Rising costs are creating problems in Kabul
Police and students have clashed for a second day running in the Afghan capital, Kabul.

At least two students died and several others were injured during a protest on Monday evening.

On Tuesday, police fired in the air and used water cannons to beat back hundreds of students at Kabul University.


We have no water. We have no bread. Everything is expensive

Nangalai, medical student
The protesters, who want better living conditions, say four students were killed by police in Monday's protest, and more than 10 injured.

They are demanding that the police responsible for the death of their colleagues should be brought to justice.

"All we're trying to do is contain them to the university right now, we can't stop it," intelligence chief Abdul Karim told The Associated Press.

Observers say this is the first time there has been violence at a demonstration since the fall of the Taleban a year ago.

The protest comes just a day before the Afghan Government was due to mark the anniversary of the capture of Kabul from the Taleban.

Inquiry promised

On Monday evening about 1,000 students gathered to protest in the west of Kabul about their poor living conditions and lack of electricity.

"We have no water. We have no bread. Everything is expensive," Nangalai, a medical student, said.

Police said students threw rocks and injured some of them - following which the police opened fire on the crowd.

"Their big mistake was to stage their protest at night," said Interior Minister Taj Mohammed Wardak.

"This has never happened before in the history of Kabul. They threw rocks at everything, every car in the area," he said.

Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai has said the police acted on their own initiative and that he was deeply upset about the incident.

He said there would be an investigation into the cause of the violence and who was responsible.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Susannah Price in Kabul
"The authorities suggested some are politically motivated"

Rebuilding

Political uncertainty

Profiles

Issues

FACT FILE

IN DEPTH

FORUM

TALKING POINT
See also:

12 Nov 02 | South Asia
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more South Asia stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more South Asia stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes