BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Urdu Hindi Pashto Bengali Tamil Nepali Sinhala
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: South Asia  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Sunday, 10 November, 2002, 11:32 GMT
Afghan women prisoners released
Kabul
Women are treated harshly in Afghanistan
As many as twenty women were released from Kabul jail on the orders of Afghan President Hamid Karzai.

The Afghan leader made the gesture in honour of the holy month of Ramadan.

The women who have gained their freedom have spent time in prison for acts that would hardly be considered crimes in most other countries.

President Karzai
Karzai ordered the release

One young woman had been sentenced to a year imprisonment for running away with a man she fell in love with, rather than participating in a forced marriage.

Another, older woman, who has five children, was jailed by her son in law, who accused her of theft.

Many of the women detainees had no clear understanding of why they were being held, or whether their cases would be heard and by which court.

Media pressure

In the past virtually their only way out would have been through bribery. So this act of presidential clemency was welcome indeed.

The women filed out of the rundown city jail, all wearing blue burkhas, to be greeted by some family members and friends.

A women cries after being told that she will not be released
The agony of not being released

One young mother, who stood with her eleven year old daughter, said she was elated to be going back to her family and going back normal life.

She said she didn't think it was purely an act of the Afghan President Hamid Karzai, to release her from eight months' imprisonment.

She thought it was the international media and the United States government who had ultimately forced her freedom.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Kylie Morris
"It's a moment full of hope"

Rebuilding

Political uncertainty

Profiles

Issues

FACT FILE

IN DEPTH

FORUM

TALKING POINT
See also:

06 Dec 01 | South Asia
04 Dec 01 | South Asia
27 Nov 01 | South Asia
24 Nov 01 | South Asia
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more South Asia stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more South Asia stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes