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Friday, 1 November, 2002, 12:00 GMT
Climate deal deadlock in Delhi
Environmental activists demonstrate in Delhi
Protestors wanted the Kyoto Protocol to be honoured
Delegates attending the UN conference on climate change in Delhi are deeply divided over the text of the final resolution.


I am under no compulsion to even bring out a Delhi Declaration on climate change

TR Balu, conference chair
Tough last-minute negotiations continued into the early hours of Friday, the summit's last day, as officials tried to hammer out a deal that all could agree on.

Differences between India, the host country, and the European Union (EU) appear to have held up an agreement until now.

Poster
A demonstrator makes his point
At one stage, India's environment minister who is chairing the conference threatened to end the meeting without tabling a resolution at all if consensus did not emerge.

"I am under no compulsion to even bring out a Delhi Declaration on climate change", TR Baalu was quoted as saying by India's PTI news agency.

Rich-poor divide

Talks are continuing to try to develop a consensus before the meeting ends on Friday.

Green Peace protest banner in Delhi
Environmentalists initially targeted the USA
Although environmentalists protested against US opposition to incorporating the Kyoto Protocol into the "Delhi Declaration", differences between India and the EU are the stumbling block.

India, acting on behalf of developing countries, wanted to put in place a system of funding cleaner technology projects in poorer countries.

The EU, articulating the viewpoint of richer countries, demanded talks on future commitments to cut greenhouse gas emissions by developing countries.

Correspondents say the focus appears to have shifted from US interest in preventing the inclusion of the Kyoto Protocol, which the USA has rejected, into the final resolution that should emerge from Delhi.

Now, discussions appear to be more polarised along a North-South divide between developed and developing countries.

See also:

30 Oct 02 | South Asia
22 Oct 02 | Science/Nature
23 Oct 02 | Science/Nature
03 Sep 02 | Europe
03 Sep 02 | Europe
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