BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Urdu Hindi Pashto Bengali Tamil Nepali Sinhala
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: South Asia  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Monday, 28 October, 2002, 17:16 GMT
Protests in India water row
A heated demonstration in Mandya
Farmers in both states have attended angry protests
Police in the southern Indian state of Karnataka have used tear gas to disperse farmers angry at having to share water with neighbouring Tamil Nadu.

Officers have made more than 600 arrests since the state government complied with a court order to release disputed river water on Sunday night.

Map
Officials say two billion cubic feet of water from the River Cauvery has been released so far - water, the farmers say, they need to irrigate their crops.

Hundreds of policemen in riot gear have been deployed at the four main Cauvery reservoirs in the region to prevent angry farmers from storming the dams.

The farmers say sharing the water will affect them most, and have been erecting roadblocks in parts of the state in protest.

Police said over 1,500 farmers had brought traffic to a standstill on the highway linking the state capital, Bangalore, with the city of Mysore.

All schools and colleges in the state have been closed until Wednesday as a security precaution.

The authorities also said they have suspended all trains passing through the region for two days.

Crisis meeting

Authorities in Karnataka decided to release the water late on Sunday.

The cabinet meeting came hours before a crucial hearing in the Supreme Court on Monday to adjudicate on a petition filed by Tamil Nadu against its neighbour.

Karnataka Chief Minister SM Krishna had been criticised for refusing to comply with a court order to release water from the Cauvery.

Last week, three judges in the Supreme Court said Karnataka was in contempt of court for deliberately disregarding the ruling.

Mr Krishna staged a march through Karnataka earlier this month to gather public support for his stand, after farmers protested against sharing water from the Cauvery reservoirs.

The bitter dispute over sharing the waters of the Cauvery, which flows through both states, has gone on for many years.

See also:

13 Sep 02 | South Asia
11 Sep 02 | South Asia
09 Sep 02 | South Asia
05 Sep 02 | South Asia
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more South Asia stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more South Asia stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes