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Tuesday, 2 July, 2002, 11:40 GMT 12:40 UK
Eyewitness: Villager describes attack
Afghan child brought to Kandahar hospital
A local man told the BBC more than 100 people died
An Afghan man from the village in eastern Afghanistan which was bombed by US aircraft on Monday night has been describing what happened.


They were all civilians here, they were peasants, not Taleban, al-Qaeda or Arabs

Local man Abdul Saboor

The villager, Abdul Saboor, contradicted US military statements about the circumstances of the attack in the Uruzgan province in which, US officials say, 30 people were killed.

Mr Saboor told the BBC's World Today programme that villagers were celebrating a wedding ceremony in a private home when suddenly, there was an attack by aircraft.

Mr Saboor said as a result of the bombing, he thought between 120 and 150 people, all civilians, were killed.

He said scores of other men, women and children were wounded in the attack.

Unattended dead

"We are not sure who informed the planes and why they bombed," Mr Saboor said, "as there were no al-Qaeda or Taleban here."

Map of Afghanistan showing Uruzgan province

Mr Saboor said the bombs fell around one in the morning.

The wounded were loaded into private cars and taken to hospital in Kandahar, the largest city in south-eastern Afghanistan.

He said some of the wounded were escorted by locally-based aid workers, but the dead were left unattended throughout the night.

Mr Saboor said whoever informed the airborne attackers and guided the raid was wrong.

"They were all civilians here," he said, "they were peasants, not Taleban, al-Qaeda or Arabs."

'Soaked with blood'

Helicopters with "foreigners", presumably Americans, arrived in the morning, and the remaining wounded were flown to hospital.

US soldier boards helicopter for operations in eastern Afghanistan
US forces have been active in the area
Among the aid workers helping with the treatment at Kandahar hospital was Sarah Chase, a member of Afghans for Civil Society, a non-governmental organisation active in the region.

She told the BBC she had seen three wounded Afghans arrive after a nine-hour drive.

They told here other wounded villagers were in cars following theirs.

"I saw a small girl suffering from what looked like a shrapnel, or something like that, in her abdomen," she said.

"She had a bandage to her hip area, and her dress was pretty soaked with blood."

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Eyewitness Abdul Saboor
"There are no al-Qaeda or Taleban here"

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20 Jun 02 | South Asia
01 Jun 02 | South Asia
30 Mar 02 | Americas
12 Feb 02 | South Asia
06 Feb 02 | South Asia
18 Apr 02 | Americas
18 Apr 02 | Americas
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