BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Urdu Hindi Pashto Bengali Tamil Nepali Sinhala
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: South Asia  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 18 June, 2002, 16:38 GMT 17:38 UK
India attacks nuclear 'blackmail'
Shaheen missile
Pakistan carried out three missile tests in May
India has denounced remarks by Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf that his country's nuclear capability stopped India attacking during the recent stand-off over Kashmir.


The international community should not ignore such continued manifestations of Pakistani irresponsibility

Indian spokeswoman Nirupama Rao
Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Nirupama Rao described his comments as "nuclear blackmail."

She said the world should not ignore "such... loose talk and undiluted hostility towards India."

President Musharraf told a gathering of scientists and engineers on Monday that the country's three ballistic missile tests in May had "completed" its deterrent capability and brought about "strategic balance" in the region.

He said they were compelled to carry out the controversial missile tests to show India they were not bluffing.

Escalation fears

President Musharraf said that in May 1998 they had carried out nuclear tests to show India they were not bluffing about their capability.

Pakistani President Musharraf
President Musharraf: Strategic balance restored
"And in May 2002 again we were compelled to show that we do not bluff," he added.

He said that India's inability to attack Pakistan or carry out a limited war demonstrated that Pakistan's conventional and nuclear capability did deter aggression.

Pakistan's tests of ballistic missiles came at the height of the crisis with India and prompted international fears they could escalate the situation.

The international community also expressed concern about Pakistan's refusal to endorse a "no first strike" policy.

Tension between the two countries has eased slightly in the past week after they came close to war following an attack by militants in the disputed territory of Kashmir.

However, India has ruled out any further moves to de-escalate the situation until Pakistan does more to curb the activities of militants.


Talking PointTALKING POINT
On the edge
Do you fear war between India and Pakistan?
Click here fror background reports and analysis

Key stories

Eyewitness

BBC WORLD SERVICE
See also:

11 Jun 02 | South Asia
10 Jun 02 | South Asia
28 May 02 | South Asia
09 Jun 02 | South Asia
23 May 02 | South Asia
29 May 02 | South Asia
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more South Asia stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more South Asia stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes