BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Urdu Hindi Pashto Bengali Tamil Nepali Sinhala
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: South Asia  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Wednesday, 5 June, 2002, 14:42 GMT 15:42 UK
Joint patrol plan bogged down
New recruits take oath of allegiance before deployment near Line of Control
Both sides remain on a war footing

Indian Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee has suggested that India and Pakistan might mount joint patrols to make sure there is no infiltration by Islamic militants into Indian-administered Kashmir across the Line of Control.


He may have felt the need to show some flexibility, in itself perhaps a good sign, but he did not shift on fundamentals

Mr Vajpayee floated the suggestion at the end of an Asian summit in Kazakhstan.

He and the Pakistani President, General Pervez Musharraf, had traded angry words in public.

Russian efforts to get a dialogue going got nowhere.

Preconditions

In the present atmosphere of bitter hostility, with a million troops glaring at each other across the border, the idea of Indians and Pakistanis cooperating in military patrols seems preposterous.

Mr Vajpayee made it clear that a precondition was Pakistan ending its support, as he sees it, for cross-border terrorism and infiltration into Indian Kashmir.

Indian PM Atal Bihari Vajpayee
Vajpayee: "No international patrol in Kashmir"

And he also rejected the often-made Pakistani proposal for international monitors to verify that no infiltration was taking place.

It was not practical in such mountainous terrain, Mr Vajpayee said, to allow a third country to do the job, and it was not necessary either.

For good measure he repeated India's standard refusal to accept international involvement in resolving the Kashmir dispute itself.

International pressure

Pakistanis argue that India is afraid to put its case to the test.

In suggesting joint patrols, Mr Vajpayee was responding to heavy international pressure and deep concern about a potentially disastrous war.

He may have felt the need to show some flexibility, in itself perhaps a good sign, but he did not shift on fundamentals and what he proposed is unlikely to be a realistic option in the short term.

Click here fror background reports and analysis

Key stories

Eyewitness

BBC WORLD SERVICE
See also:

05 Jun 02 | South Asia
04 Jun 02 | Media reports
03 Jun 02 | South Asia
03 Jun 02 | South Asia
02 Jun 02 | South Asia
01 Jun 02 | South Asia
01 Jun 02 | South Asia
05 Jun 02 | South Asia
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more South Asia stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more South Asia stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes