BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Urdu Hindi Pashto Bengali Tamil Nepali Sinhala
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: South Asia  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Sunday, 26 May, 2002, 14:39 GMT 15:39 UK
Nepal ruling party expels PM
Girija Prasad Koirala in Kathmandu
Party president Girija Prasad Koirala (left) suspended Deuba
Nepal's political crisis has deepened with the governing Nepali Congress Party expelling Prime Minister Sher Bahadur Deuba for three years.


I have no intentions of splitting the Nepali Congress party

Sher Bahadur Deuba, Prime Minister

This is the first time in Nepal's 12 years of parliamentary democracy that a prime minister has been thrown out by his party.

The action comes three days after the prime minister recommended dissolution of the parliament and called for fresh elections.

Mr Deuba has been facing stiff opposition from within his own party to extend the state of emergency.

Analysts say his expulsion has raised the prospect of a split in the party.

Next move

Reacting to his expulsion, Mr Deuba told the BBC that he had no intentions of splitting the party.

Sher Bahadur Deuba
Deuba: Planning next move

He said it was not for the party's central working committee to expel anyone.

Mr Deuba said he would soon convene a general convention of the party to discuss the issue.

Mr Deuba's expulsion came despite frantic efforts to resolve the crisis within the ruling party.

A leading figure in the Nepali Congress party, Krishna Prasad Bhattarai, had returned to Kathmandu from London to oversee reconciliation efforts between Mr Deuba and a former prime minister, Girija Prasad Koirala.

The dispute follows Mr Deuba's attempts to extend the state of emergency to fight Maoists rebels.

Constitutional status

Opposition parties as well as members of Mr Deuba's own party opposed the move, calling it an attempt to stifle the country's young democracy.

Finding himself in a tight spot over the revolt in his party, Mr Deuba recommended dissolution of the parliament and called for fresh elections, further angering the dissidents.

A spokesman of the Nepali Congress party, Arjun Narsingh KC, said the party's disciplinary committee rejected Mr Deuba's explanation of the controversial move.

Analysts say Mr Deuba's expulsion may not affect his position as the prime minister but may trigger a debate over his constitutional status.

Background to Nepal's Maoist war

Analysis

Eyewitness

Background:

BBC NEPALI SERVICE
See also:

24 May 02 | South Asia
24 May 02 | South Asia
23 May 02 | South Asia
23 Apr 02 | Country profiles
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more South Asia stories are at the foot of the page.



Links to more South Asia stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes