BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: World: South Asia
Front Page 
World 
Africa 
Americas 
Asia-Pacific 
Europe 
Middle East 
South Asia 
-------------
From Our Own Correspondent 
-------------
Letter From America 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 

Tuesday, 3 July, 2001, 09:54 GMT 10:54 UK
Nepal palace officials sacked
Armed police in Kathmandu
Security is being reviewed following the massacre
Four senior security officials at the Nepalese royal palace have been sacked after last month's massacre in which the king, queen and seven other family members were murdered.


They were fired for negligence of their duty at the time of the massacre.

Defence Secretary Padam Kumar Acharya
Defence Secretary Padam Kumar Acharya said that the officials had been dismissed on the grounds of negliect of duty.

They were named as Colonel Sundar Pratap Rana, Major Ananta Keshar Simha, Raju Karki and Gajendra Bohara.

An official enquiry into the shootings found that the then Crown Prince, Dipendra, carried them out before apparently killing himself.

Personnel changes

Some of those dismissed were personal bodyguards responsible for the safety of the late king, queen and the crown prince.

Crown Prince of Nepal
Crown Prince Dipendra: Blamed for carrying out killings
It is not clear in what respect they were held to be negligent.

The enquiry into the massacre noted that Crown Prince Dipendra had been intoxicated on drink and drugs on the evening when he carried out the massacre.

Reports from the royal palace say that a number of other changes to security personnel have been made.

Mr Acharya told the BBC that King Gyanendra has appointed the aide-de-camp (ADC) to the slain Prince Nirajan as his new ADC.

King Gyanendra recently ordered a security review following concerns about security lapses at the palace.

Insurgency fears

An inquiry panel has also recommended a revamp of palace security following concern in the government over Maoist rebel violence.

The rebels are fighting to replace Nepal's constitutional monarchy with a communist republic, and have vowed to step up violence following the palace killings.

They say that the killing was the outcome of a national and international conspiracy.

More than 1,700 people have been killed since the rebellion began five years ago.

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
See also:

29 Jun 01 | South Asia
Nepal king backs democracy
14 Jun 01 | South Asia
Prince blamed for Nepal massacre
07 Jun 01 | From Our Own Correspondent
Nepal's night of bloodshed
05 Apr 01 | South Asia
Mao in the mountains
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more South Asia stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more South Asia stories