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Thursday, 14 June, 2001, 17:07 GMT 18:07 UK
Prince blamed for Nepal massacre
Mourning
The killings left many Nepalese shocked and confused
A drunken Crown Prince Dipendra killed his parents, the King and Queen of Nepal, and seven other royals before killing himself, an official investigation has found.

The inquiry panel's report was made public shortly after being handed over to the new King Gyanendra.

The late Crown Prince Dipendra with gun
Dipendra had a liking for guns
One of the panel members, parliament speaker Taranath Ranabhat, told a news conference: "A drunken crown prince indiscriminately fired, killing the royals."

Police were deployed in force as the report was published, amid fears of a repeat of the rioting that followed the 1 June massacre.

Girlfriend sought

The two-man investigating panel set up by King Gyanendra to look into the killings interviewed more than 100 people during the week-long inquiry.

Devyani Rana
Devyani Rana: Believed to be in Europe
The panel spoke to eyewitnesses, and heard evidence from palace officials, guards and staff.

On Wednesday, they asked if they could speak to Dipendra's girlfriend Devyani Rana, who is believed to have fled Nepal immediately after the massacre.

But she is reportedly in Europe, and reluctant to return to Kathmandu.

No conclusion

The panel stressed that it was not giving its conclusions, but merely providing information it had acquired during its investigation.

King Gyanendra of Nepal
Many Nepalese are reluctant to accept the new king
Eyewitness accounts made public after the shooting said Dipendra was responsible - although they failed to shed any light on his motives.

But there were suggestions after the shooting that he had had a bitter row with his parents because they opposed his plans to marry Devyani Rana.

The killings shocked ordinary Nepalese, many of whom refused to believe that Dipendra was responsible.

Two people were killed and 19 injured in days of rioting after the massacre.

Three nights of curfews eventually helped calm the situation.

Farewell ceremony

In Kathmandu, a ceremony has taken place to bid farewell to Dipendra's soul.

Brahmin priest rides an elephant out of Kathmandu in a traditional Hindu ceremony
The ceremony should banish bad luck
He died two days after the palace shooting from self-inflicted injuries.

Tradition demands that 11 days after his death, a Brahmin priest should dress up in clothes and eat a ritually impure meal.

He is then escorted out of Kathmandu on an elephant, along with clothes, jewellery, furniture and other possessions of the late crown prince.

After spending three days in the adjoining town of Patan, he will have to leave the area, never to return again.

Crowds gathered to watch the ceremony, which was attended by top officials.

A similar ceremony was held on Monday for the late King Birendra.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Jill Mcgivering
"Many people are struggling to make sense of it"
The BBC's Emma Simpson
"The royal massacre has turned this Himalayan kingdom upside down"
Kanak Dixit, publisher of Himal magazine
"Aides confirm... there had been a flurry of phone calls between the crown prince and his lady friend, Miss Devyani Rana"

Key stories:

World reaction:

Background:

BBC NEPALI SERVICE

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TALKING POINT

FORUM
See also:

14 Jun 01 | South Asia
13 Jun 01 | South Asia
12 Jun 01 | South Asia
11 Jun 01 | South Asia
07 Jun 01 | South Asia
06 Jun 01 | South Asia
02 Jun 01 | South Asia
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