BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: World: South Asia
Front Page 
World 
Africa 
Americas 
Asia-Pacific 
Europe 
Middle East 
South Asia 
-------------
From Our Own Correspondent 
-------------
Letter From America 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 

Friday, 17 November, 2000, 13:41 GMT
Pakistan faces brain drain
Pakistan market
Many are losing faith in Pakistan's economic future
By Zaffar Abbas in Islamabad

More than two-thirds of Pakistan's adult population wants to go abroad to work, a survey by Gallup-Pakistan has found.

The survey also found that half of those who want to go abroad do not wish to return.

Gallup-Pakistan says the survey indicates that many Pakistanis are gradually losing faith in the country's economic future.

A similar survey carried out in 1984 had found only 17% Pakistanis eager to settle abroad.

Better prospects

The latest survey has strengthened the widely-held view that there has been a continuous brain drain from the country in the past decade.

Worker sits outside a closed shop
Even unskilled people want to go abroad
The poll indicates that not only qualified professionals and university graduates, but even semi-skilled or unskilled workers want to leave Pakistan in search of better prospects.

About 62% of the adults interviewed for the survey said they would like to work abroad.

And as many as 38% said they would prefer to permanently settle outside the country.

The report says that a similar survey carried out by the same organisation in 1984 had showed only 17% in favour of settling outside the country.

Analysing the survey statistics, Gallup-Pakistan says the marked change is mainly the result of local economic conditions.

But despite this diminishing confidence in Pakistan's economic future, says the survey, nearly 90% of the people still take pride in being the citizen of the country.

And it goes on to say that only one per cent of the 1,500 people interviewed from across the country said they feel ashamed of calling themselves a Pakistani.

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
See also:

01 Sep 00 | South Asia
Pakistan boosts internet access
31 Aug 00 | South Asia
Pakistan may get emergency funds
22 Aug 00 | Business
The losers of the digital divide
14 Oct 99 | The Economy
Pakistan's economic nightmare
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more South Asia stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more South Asia stories