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Last Updated: Wednesday, 6 December 2006, 08:21 GMT
School Day 24: Malaysia-UK
Malaysian pupils taking part in the link-up

A team from BBC Radio's Science Unit has hosted a link-up between schoolchildren in Malaysia and the UK.

Question from MRSM residential school, Kuala Kubu Baru, Malaysia to pupils at Royal Latin School, Buckingham, UK

Does science play a very important role in your daily life? Are you not interested in science and is it boring?

Science in Action presenter Sue Broom with pupils and teachers outside The Royal Latin School in central England
The Royal Latin is a specialist science college
Emily: I don't think that science is boring. In this country, it is very hard to get into. I'm very fortunate to be in a school where we're all very enthusiastic about science.

Joe:We in the UK do find science interesting. I do - I'm doing science subjects at school. But the UK's a developed nation, and for the Malaysian students science is very important to help them develop their country. In the UK, we don't see science like that because we don't need to develop our country further. All we need to do is maintain the same level of activity.

Question from Royal Latin School, Buckingham, UK to pupils at MRSM residential school, Kuala Kubu Baru, Malaysia

In this country it is really competitive and quite hard to get into medicine. How easy is it to get into that sort of field in Malaysia?

Gurpreet: It's not hard to enter medicine because we know our topics and syllabus, we know what we are going into.

So we will automatically work hard to get into medicine because we know that's what we are aiming for, and we know that science is our major, so we will do our best in it.

Question from MRSM residential school, Kuala Kubu Baru, Malaysia to pupils at Royal Latin School, Buckingham, UK

I would like to know how the teaching at your place is done because teaching affects our impression of science.

Greta: I think that in sixth form we are very fortunate to have good teachers at the moment, but I've definitely experienced some bad teachers before coming to this school.

Emily: I think if you have the facilities and enthusiastic teachers, that's definitely going to get you interested. If your school doesn't have facilities or teachers who are interested in their subject, then you're going to be put off it, but we're very lucky in our school that we have that.

Question from MRSM residential school, Kuala Kubu Baru, Malaysia to pupils at Royal Latin School, Buckingham, UK

As we are well informed, mathematics and science are very well rated, and some say mathematics is the language of science. How do students in the UK respond to mathematics?

Emily: I think that for most of the students in this school who take all three sciences, maths is an accompaniment. A lot of people only take it for one year because it is very difficult and it gets a lot harder after GCSE/O-level, but it is quite popular to do alongside science.

Question from MRSM residential school, Kuala Kubu Baru, Malaysia to pupils at Royal Latin School, Buckingham, UK

Before you started studying science, what inspired you to want to do it? Was it your family or friends or people around you?

Map showing UK and Malaysia
Chang: What inspired us from a young age is the government, because the government encourages us a lot. Ever since primary school they have been saying: "Science is good".

They have campaigns about science, and when we come to secondary school, teachers will say to good students who have good results and are able to study: "You should take science, it's good for your future."

Triven: The wheels of a bicycle inspired me. As you cycle, you see the wheels turning round, at one moment it's up and the next it's down. It's all about science. The energy absorbed in the tyre is what inspired me.

Un-named female student: For me, my parents inspired me, they let me read science magazines when I was young, and they said: "Science is very good, you should take science when you're older."


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UK and Malaysian students on inspirations in science





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