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Last Updated: Monday, 1 May 2006, 12:04 GMT 13:04 UK
Pop stars back new climate laws
Incineration plant (Getty Images)
Friends of the Earth have called for a reduction in CO2 emissions
Some of the UK's top musicians are playing a concert in support of Friends of the Earth's Big Ask campaign.

Thom Yorke and Jonny Greenwood from Radiohead and Gruff Rhys, of the Super Furry Animals, are taking part in the London gig on bank holiday Monday.

It is the first of a series of concerts designed to highlight the campaign to change the law on CO2 emissions.

Thom Yorke said taking part took away his sense of "powerlessness" over climate change.

Gruff Rhys said: "Climate change is going to affect us all so we all need to do something about it."

Friends of the Earth wants new climate change laws which would force the government to cut emissions of carbon dioxide, the main greenhouse gas, by 3% each year.

The government recently revealed the UK is unlikely to meet its target of reducing CO2 emissions by 20% by 2010.

The Climate Change Programme review projects that new and existing policies will only deliver a cut of 15-18% by the end of the decade.

An online survey for Friends of the Earth by TNS found 75% of respondents would support a new law.

Tony Juniper, Friends of the Earth director, said: "Like Thom Yorke and the other artists playing The Big Ask Live, the vast majority of people want to see the government take action to tackle climate change.

"This means a new climate change law that would require the government to make annual reductions in the UK's carbon emissions."

Some 1,233 adults aged between 16 and 64 were interviewed online from 25 to 27 April 2006.




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