BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Science/Nature  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 18 June, 2002, 09:57 GMT 10:57 UK
Audiogalaxy moves to filter songs
Compact disc
Record industry is worried about music piracy
Music-sharing service Audiogalaxy is to take steps to purge pirated songs and recordings from its online service.

In a deal struck with music publishers and record makers, Audiogalaxy has agreed to pay an unspecified sum in damages and has pledged to improve its anti-piracy efforts.

Users report that Audiogalaxy has already started filtering the music available to members.

The deal has been made to ward off further legal action by music industry groups that has already forced some other net music sites to close.

Missing music

The Recording Industry Association of America and the National Music Publishers Association sued Audiogalaxy in May of this year, alleging that it was encouraging piracy.

"This should serve as a wake-up call to the other networks that facilitate unauthorised copying," said Hilary Rosen, chairman of the RIAA.

Audiogalaxy, like Napster and other net-based systems, lets members share the music on their computers with other users.

Many people have converted CDs they have bought to MP3 audio files and then shared them with other people in defiance of copyright laws, which place restrictions on the "fair use" of purchased music.

The full terms of the payment and anti-piracy agreements were not fully disclosed. But Audiogalaxy is understood to have pledged to operate a "filter-in" system that only allows it to share music if it has permission from copyright holders.

Early reports by Audiogalaxy users suggest that music freely available last week has now disappeared from the service.

The deal is the latest in a series of victories for the music industry which is waging a long running campaign against the swapping of music on the internet.

Recently, peer-to-peer network Kazaa ran out of funds to contest legal action brought against it by the music industry, and in early June, Napster filed for bankruptcy protection.

See also:

20 Jul 01 | Business
23 May 02 | Science/Nature
20 May 02 | Science/Nature
18 Mar 02 | Science/Nature
23 Apr 02 | Science/Nature
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Science/Nature stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Science/Nature stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes