Page last updated at 15:14 GMT, Tuesday, 22 December 2009

Floods and drought in South Africa

Learners in South African schools discuss the effect of flooding in their communities.

Their comments coincide with the opening day of the UN's Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, Denmark.


by learners at Kimberly-Vuyolwethu School
for BBC News School Report from Kimberly, North Cape

Students in South Africa experience extreme weather conditions
Students in South Africa experience extreme weather conditions

Recently Kimberly received heavy rain which caused many houses to flood and tar roads to collapse in Galeshewe. Kimberley has also experienced severe hot weather.

Analysis of the impacts of climate change suggest that agro-ecological systems are the most vulnerable sectors. Agriculture in low-latitude developing countries is expected to be especially vulnerable because climates of many of these countries are already too hot.


by learners at Kimberly Boys School
for BBC News School Report from Kimberly, North Cape

The 2010 FIFA stadium will have plans to minimise drinking water usage by 10%
Student
Kimberly Boys School, North Cape

The United Nations Climate Change Conference will be on at the Berlin Centre in Copenhagen, Denmark from 7 to 18 December 2009. The 15th conference of the parties is the follow-up of the Kyoto conference in 1996.

Experts predict that of the participating countries, only a handful will not sign the environmental agreement. Surprise factors will be that the developed countries and technology power houses like the United States of America and Japan will most probably sign.

Keeping up with the greenhouse factor, the 2010 World Cup is just a few months away. With technological advances, the local organising community is trying to make the event a more environmentally friendly showcase.

Some of the methods they are using to minimise environmental damage include a 50m rand underground spring water system in the Greenpoint Stadium in Cape Town.

Future generations

Also, the 2010 FIFA stadium will have plans to minimise drinking water usage by 10%, and to improve waste management and energy efficiency. It will also promote the use of public transport and diversity in landscaping.

Three students working on computers
Students worked together to produce a news report

Some of the other possibilities are wind turbines to provide 10% of electricity usage, and a roof made of cables and fabric to minimise greenhouse gases and insulate the stadium.

With all these measures in place, the World Cup is sure to have a positive effect on our environment and ensure that our future generations see the brilliant show piece that we put on in South Africa.


by learners at Ubuhle Bezwe Junior Secondary School
for BBC News School Report from Shoshanguve

The winners of a British Council Connecting Classrooms competition are going to represent the South Africa youth in the Climate Conference on the 7 to the 18 December, 2009 in Copenhagen. The two students, aged 16 and 17, are international climate change champions.

Some of the students' comments were used in the BBC World News for Children bulletin which is broadcast Monday to Friday on the World Class website and available between 1300 and 1700 GMT on the Newsround website. It can be downloaded for free and accompanying scripts are also available.



SEE ALSO
Climate Change Interactive
19 Nov 09 |  Have Your Say

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