Page last updated at 10:10 GMT, Friday, 20 February 2009

Reporting Scotland anchor quizzed

School Reporters from Lenzie Academy in East Dunbartonshire paid a visit to the BBC's headquarters in Glasgow to interview broadcaster Sally Magnusson and take a behind-the-scenes look at "Reporting Scotland".

Three students reflect on their experiences.

By Scott
School Reporter, Lenzie Academy, East Dunbartonshire

Sally Magnusson with students
Incidents which stuck out clearly for Sally included reporting on the Dunblane massacre in 1996 and the murder of a close friend and colleague, Jill Dando
Scott

As part of the BBC News School Report 2009, five pupils from Lenzie Academy, ranging from 1st to 4th Year, visited the BBC Scotland headquarters at Pacific Quay, Glasgow.

As part of the visit, the pupils were lucky enough to be given a tour of the BBC newsrooms and radio studios as well as the highlight of the day - a visit to Studio C where Reporting Scotland is filmed and a chance to watch Sally Magnusson rehearse and read the one o'clock news live from the production gallery.

The ultimate event of the day was of course being given the opportunity to interview Sally Magnusson herself.

Along with some serious questions from the budding news reporters, there were also the less serious. For example, when asked: "Who would you like to interview, but haven't had the chance?" Sally answered without hesitation: "George Clooney" - short and to the point.

Ups and downs

She also talked about the funny and the sad sides of reporting the news, the difficulties of co-presenting which has been known to cause unstoppable laughter from the presenter - even at what may have been an inappropriate moment - and reporting on tragedies and issues close to your heart.

School Reporters Kirsty, Victoria and Ciaran from Lenzie Academy in East Dunbartonshire
School Reporters Kirsty, Victoria and Ciaran

Incidents which stuck out clearly for Sally included reporting on the Dunblane massacre in 1996 and the murder of a close friend and colleague, Jill Dando.

Sally spoke of how in these moments she finds herself entering an almost autopilot mode where she has to detach herself from the situation whilst still drawing that fine line by showing the public that you are not an "automaton to your emotions", yet not letting them get the better of you.

It was a great day and was thoroughly enjoyed by all - even the teachers!


By Natalie
School Reporter, Lenzie Academy, East Dunbartonshire

School Reporter Natalie from Lenzie Academy in East Dunbartonshire
Natalie practises presenting in front of the Sport set

On Thursday 12 February, Katie, one of my classmates, and I were chosen to go with three second year students to the BBC studios in Glasgow to meet news presenter and journalist Sally Magnusson. We watched her read the news and then we interviewed her.

On arrival

When we arrived at the studios, we were given passes and a lady took us to meet Sally Magnusson. When we met Sally, she took us to the filming studio where we watched her read the lunchtime news. After this, we got to stand next to the weather or sports screen and pretend to present the weather or sport.

We were taken to the gallery, where we met the sound manager, producer and the rest of the team. We then got to see Reporting Scotland put together, and then broadcast.

Question time

Sally then took us into the Green Room, which is where people go for meetings or interviews. This was where we got to interview Sally. These are some of the questions and answers:

Our first question was: How did you become a presenter?

Sally replied: "I used to work for a newspaper and someone saw an article I wrote and asked if wanted to go onto a television programme."

Next we asked: Do you get to choose what to wear on TV?

Sally said: "Yes, but we are not supposed to wear anything with too many patterns."

Nearing the end

We then had to go and get our taxi. We had five minutes to explore the public area of the studios. We spotted really big, green towers. We opened the doors to find a projector and a screen. We watched a few programmes. Then we had to go.

This was a great opportunity and I am so glad I had the chance to go.


By Katie
School Reporter, Lenzie Academy, East Dunbartonshire

Sally Magnusson with School Reporters from Lenzie Academy in East Dunbartonshire
Sally Magnusson with School Reporters

Natalie and I enjoyed watching Sally reading the news, live. It looked weird watching it from behind the cameras. I got to stand in front of the weather board and sit on her chair.

After watching Sally doing the news, we went into a room where the director controlled what people were doing and told them when to start and stop.

There were four people in the room: the director, someone who did the colours to make sure they were right, someone who put the notes at the bottom of the screen when a new person is talking and someone who was in charge of the sound.

I asked Sally: What qualifications do you need?

She said: "You don't need any qualifications but you need to be able to talk clearly and be confident."

We all had a wonderful time - and learned a lot!



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