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BBC News Interactive School ReportBBC News Interactive School Report
Last Updated: Thursday, 22 March 2007, 19:29 GMT
School Report News Day - hour by hour
Students learn how to use a camera
More than 100 schools across the country are taking part

Students from more than 100 schools across the UK have taken part in live broadcasts on this website.

The day's highlights can be seen on the School Report website.

BBC reporters have visited schools around the country to see what pupils are producing and offering their own expertise.

Read below to see what happened and where.

1555 :: BBC DIRECTOR GENERAL ON SCHOOL REPORT

BBC Director General Mark Thompson
Mark Thompson spoke to students taking part in School Report

School Report is a new departure for the BBC but, judging by the response so far from students in schools all over the UK, it's struck a chord already, writes BBC Director General Mark Thompson.

I spoke to Scott, a student at Shawlands Academy in Glasgow, who has spent the day working on a story about a 14-year-old former pupil who is an asylum-seeker now at risk of deportation.

Students are organising a petition calling for her to be allowed to remain in the UK - and to return to her studies at Shawlands.

It's their top story and it's going to feature not just in the school's own news report but on Reporting Scotland on BBC One Scotland this evening.

"The whole experience has been fantastic," Scott told me: "I've decided I want to become a journalist."

School Report may inspire some 12- and 13-year-olds to consider a career in the media. But we also hope it will make all the students who take part in it think about journalism, media and the big issues of the day in a new way.

Like everyone else at the BBC, I'm very proud of School Report. One hundred or so schools have taken part in this first year. Next year, I'm sure it will be many, many more.

After interviewing the students and staff at the school, Mark Thompson said: "There is a lot of excitement about School Report at Shawlands in Scotland.

"It's interesting to hear about students who believed that there weren't any news stories in their area, but after thinking about it, realised there were some great stories under their noses."

1550:: A DEMOCRATIC EDITORIAL APPROACH

TOP ISSUES OF THE DAY
School leaving age
Healthy eating
Size zero
Global warming
Death of Pakistan cricket coach
Slave trade
Crime and gang culture
School buildings
Launch of Playstation 3
Royal Navy submarine accident

There was no autocratic editor in charge of the newsroom at Barking Abbey Comprehensive School, east London.

Instead decisions on the programme content and running order were taken with a show of hands.

They were not just democratic, but quick on their feet too, choosing the school leaving age story as their lead item.

Teacher Gareth Carey said he was impressed: "They found their stories, researched them then had a meeting. It was obvious education would be the top story."

DuShann, 12, presented the weather and sports news.

"I'm glad I did it," he said, "I got a bit nervous at the beginning but it gives me inspiration as to what to do when I'm older."

"I'd like to work for the BBC when I'm older. But I want to be an animation artist. My dream job is working at Pixar."

1535 :: CAMERON'S BOYBAND BOWLOVER

Conservative leader David Cameron meets students
Mr Cameron met students from Park House School

"If the Conservative Party was to form a boyband, who would be in it?" was just one of the questions fired at Conservative Party Leader David Cameron by four school reporters from Park House School in Berkshire.

Sadly, Mr Cameron was quick to rule out the possibility on the grounds that "there are no wannabe members of Take That."

Bridie, 12, said: "I asked the question because politics is sometimes a bit boring and I thought it would be interesting to see who he chose."

Bridie had previously asked Mr Cameron who he would invite to a dinner party; Tony Blair or Gordon Brown?.

Rhys, 13, pressed Mr Cameron on his environmental credentials, asking why he had recently taken a short flight in the UK despite pledging to adopt greener policies.

1525 :: GIRLS BECOME RADIO STARS

Pupils from St Catherine's Catholic School for Girls in Bexleyheath, Kent, have impressed their BBC mentor with an admirable display of their journalistic skills.

Not only did the 13-year-olds show great news sense in seizing on a BBC News website story about a teacher in Nigeria being killed by her pupils, but they also presented a bulletin live on local radio.

The 13 girls produced and presented the 1400 bulletin on community station TGR Sound, based in Erith.

Then they prepared a pre-recorded bulletin for 1600. Both are due to appear on the station's website as well as on School Report.

Mentor Marie Helly said: "They were very nervous but they did really well. The Nigeria story was the kind we would have run on The World Tonight, where I work".

1515 :: SCHOOL REPORTERS HIT THE SIX

One of the School Reporters at Bridge of Don Academy has recorded a piece to camera for the BBC's Six O'Clock News.

The programme was interested in a series of radio packages the School Report team has been producing.

One, already played on BBC Radio Scotland, was an interview with three star players at Aberdeen Football Club.

Team sports reporter Ross said: "This experience was really good as it opened our eyes to the possible future all of us could have in sports journalism."

1512 :: INSIDE DOWNING STREET

Prime Minister Tony Blair meets students
Students quizzed the prime minister at Number 10 Downing Street

Students from three different schools have been to interview Prime Minister Tony Blair.

Pardeep, from Lyng Hall school in the West Midlands, was among them.

The 13-year-old quizzed the prime minister on global warming. She said Mr Blair told her that the government is trying to do everything it can to solve the problem.

Politics aside, Pardeep said Number 10 was, "really posh inside", and she added that her visit was: "Absolutely fantastic, it's something that is going to stay in my memory for the rest of my life".

1500 :: PRIMROSE HIGH TACKLE STORIES THAT MATTER

School Reporters at Primrose High School have been tackling the school leaving age, more money for schools in the Budget and the launch of Playstation 3.

They have also been investigating an Easter egg robbery after some of the chocolates were stolen from the back of a lorry.

Shabana, 12, said: "It's tiring but it's fun. I chose to do the launch of the Playstation 3 - I think kids and adults would like it. I did some interviews, asking people at my school if they were going buy one."

1455:: MANHOLE SHOCK - KIDS ARE LOOKING INTO IT!

Wootton Bassett pupils went in search of the "hole" truth when they discovered that a woman had fallen down one.

The children, from the town's specialist technology college, interviewed the woman, who told them she suffered two cracked ribs and bruising.

However, the story is not yet complete - no one seems to know who the hole belongs to.

1432 :: PUPIL WINS BUS FARE CAMPAIGN

A pupil at Chatham South School in Kent is celebrating on School Report day after helping secure half-price bus fares for him and his fellow pupils.

George, who is in Year 8, spearheaded a campaign with his mother, Jenette, to persuade bus providers to subsidise services before 9am.

The news made front page on the Chatham South's School Report website, alongside a variety of other reports about the school, the area and even abroad.

Another breaking-news story was the announcement that the school was to receive a council grant of 1,000, which the pupils will help decide how to spend.

During their hectic day, the 30 12- and 13-year-olds also appeared on BBC regional television and local radio.

1425 :: BORO ASK QUESTIONS OF REPORTERS

Students interview Middlesbrough football team
Students met the Middlesbrough football team

Reporters from the Unity Academy found themselves answering questions as well as asking them when they went to interview Middlesbrough football team.

"They asked us if we enjoyed school and what we wanted to do after we left," the sound editor, Catherine, 14, said.

The School Reporters videoed the encounter and later added music to clips of the players talking to camera.

"It was amazing - an absolutely unbelievable experience. Everyone was extremely excited," Catherine added.

1419 :: LIVE WEATHER FROM LEWISHAM

Lewisham City Learning Centre website hosted a live weather predicting a chilly end to the week.

Two of its students, Michelle and Jenny, acted as anchors, and the team used BBC graphics and music to give the webcast an authentic feel.

Students from Bonus Pastor Catholic College, Deptford Green and Forest Hill schools were involved in the broadcast.

1418 :: FULL INTERVIEWS WITH PARTY LEADERS

The full interviews with the political party leaders are being broadcast.

Students from Coventry quizzed Tony Blair at his offices in Number 10 Downing Street.

Questions included the war in Iraq, education, and what Mr Blair will do once he finishes his role as prime minister.

1410 :: HOODIE BAN TOPS WILLINGDON BULLETIN

A recent ban on hoodies and mp3 players in school is the lead item in a TV news bulletin prepared by pupils at Willingdon School in Eastbourne.

Ten school reporters filmed segments for the report on video cameras, including vox-pops with pupils and an interview with the headmaster.

Second item on the bulletin was a controversial plan to close a maternity ward at a local hospital.

1400 :: REGIONAL REPORTS BROADCAST SCHOOL NEWS

Some 40 local radio stations across England and the Channel Islands have been broadcasting reports made by students.

In Cornwall the lunchtime phone-in came live from Sir James Smith School in Camelford, where the presenter got to pick the brains of children as to the important news of the day.

The radio car at BBC Essex visited Bishops Park School in Clacton where the students experienced how journalists reach the top of their game - battling against the elements to broadcast live in very windy conditions.

Many stations have been broadcasting school bulletins, like Lancashire, where it came from their fully equipped bus.

Marden High School in Newcastle also had to contend with going live not once (for BBC Breakfast Television) but twice on BBC Radio Newcastle throughout the day.

But it's not just in England - on BBC Cymru students have been giving their bulletins in Welsh.

1345 :: SCHOOL LEAVING AGE AND KNIFE CRIME

Director of BBC News Helen Boaden at Sion Manning School, London
BBC News Director Helen Boaden visited Sion Manning school

Pupils at Sion Manning RC Girls' School in London have suggested a possible link with raising the school-leaving age and reducing knife crime.

They discussed the issue on their TV bulletin which they have just finished editing in time for broadcast at 1400GMT.

The news anchor for the day, Nassra, 13, said working to a deadline was the hardest part of the project.

"It was fun and I enjoyed," she said, "but you had to get all done in a couple of hours."

1341 :: BREAKING NEWS AT CHARTERS SCHOOL

The international news desk at Charters School in Sunningdale, Berkshire, has been working on breaking news about the violence in Somalia, and the death of two soldiers after an accident onboard submarine HMS Tireless.

An email wire feed has been set up in the school to allow the reporters to update their stories as and when new developments occur.

Editor Jack, 13, said that this meant that his team had to work quickly to get the very latest news published as soon as possible.

Jack added: "We've also done some stories about celebrities, the kind of thing you find in non-serious papers. I'm in charge because I started bossing the others around! I'm like Gordon Ramsay, but not with the swearing."

1340 :: SCHOOL REPORTERS GO LIVE ON RADIO

Reporters from St Robert of Newminster School have been quizzed live on Radio Newcastle after one of the producers spotted them on a tour of BBC studios.

He was producing a programme about school discipline when he spotted the pupils and decided to put them on air.

Three of the School Reporters ended up giving their views on the programme.

And the experience stood them in good stead as they later landed an exclusive interview themselves - with the star player in a football team.

1330 :: LUNCHTIME DEBATE IN GUILDFORD

Guildford County School
Students created a radio bulletin for School Report

The hot topic of whether students should be allowed to eat their lunch outside the canteen is the lead item on a radio bulletin being prepared by the school report newsroom at Guildford County School.

Tom, 13, said: "We did vox pops with kids and interviewed dinner ladies and the deputy head about the rule.

"She said it can't be changed because of the litter problem. If you break the rule at the moment you get a detention - and it's a bad detention because you have to go and pick gum off from under the desks."

Finbarr, 13, also interviewed TV composer Howard Goodall - who wrote the themes to Blackadder and the Catherine Tate show - about music in schools.

School Reporters also spoke to a professor from a local sleep institute about the effect of sleep deprivation on 13-year-olds.

1325 :: SOUND OF MUSIC WOWS AUDIENCE

St Cecilia's College are preparing to broadcast their news reports live on BBC Radio Ulster.

They covered at least 15 different stories but one of the highlights was the school show - a production of The Sound of Music.

The students filmed the preparations as well as the final performance, which was a huge hit with the audience.

1315 :: STUDENTS UNCOVER LOCAL HISTORY

A condemned tyre depot in a Norfolk town has been found to have a secret history as a World War One hanger.

Students at North Walsham High School were able to visit the building before demolition contractors move in.

They discovered it had been built in 1915 on an airfield at Bacton, also in Norfolk, and was used until 1919. Parts of the dismantled building will go to museums in London, Glasgow and Norwich.

School Reporter Jack, 13, said: "When I got there it seemed empty. It was an ugly building, but it's history."

The story will be posted along with others on the school's website.

"Doing it was better than a lot of stories," said Jack, "We got to go out and to talk to people on the phone."

1309 :: HEAD BLAMES UNCARING PARENTS

The head teacher at Broomfield School in London says it is busy parents and not rap music that is to blame for knife crime.

Angus Walker told School Reporters that he thought children turned to violence when they didn't get enough attention from their parents.

He was being interviewed as part of the school's coverage of the BBC's News Day, which will also include a feature on tattoos and Wembley stadium.

1300 :: COOMBESHEAD COLLEGE MAKES NEWS

Students at Coombeshead College have made a video looking at how students feel about School Report and some of the issues they will be covering on the day.

Watch the report here:

1258 :: OUR SCHOOL IS LIKE A TARDIS IN REVERSE

Bishops Park College in Clacton, Essex is actually three schools in one, say its pupils. They have been preparing a radio report on what makes it so special.

The three "schools within a school" are called Lighthouses, Windmills and Towers.

One of the reasons behind the split is for students to be able to work with a smaller group of teachers as they progress.

Kane, 13,said: "I like it because it looks really big from the outside, but is small inside. It's like the opposite of the tardis."

1225 :: MORE BOBBIES ON THE BUSES

Labour MP Steve Pound met students at Drayton Manor High School
Mr Pound met students at Drayton Manor High School

There will be more police patrolling the buses in west London, Labour MP Steve Pound has revealed to pupils at Drayton Manor High School.

The Ealing North MP told School Reporters that the increase in policing followed a number of assaults and robberies on public transport.

He was talking to the school's media club which is busy preparing a 15-minute TV bulletin.

As well as the interview with Mr Pound, there will also be items on school meals and the abolition of slavery.

1240 :: FORT HILL INSIGHT INTO AFRICA

Students at Fort Hill
Students investigated plans to build a new local football pitch

A 22-strong team of Year 8 reporters at Fort Hill School in Basingstoke have been writing online previews of their forthcoming Africa Week, in which their school will link up with pupils in Africa.

Closer to home, students have been finding out more about plans to build a new local football pitch, interviewing representatives from the construction company as well as the Hampshire Football Association.

Students have also turned their hand to news graphic design by preparing a picture to illustrate a report about overweight pets, and are even working on a weather forecast, to be presented by Sam, 13.

Teacher Sue Morley-Smith said: "The group has been organised into three teams, with one or two editors per group. Later, they're going to write blogs about their personal thoughts about the day".

1235:: GREAT BRITAIN DAY FOR WITHYWOOD

Ship mast on SS Great Britain
Pupils covered the restoration of masts on Brunel's SS Great Britain

The BBC's man on the spot made sure pupils at Withywood School in Bristol had a packed news agenda to sift through.

A total of 50 youngsters, aged 13 to 15, are taking part, covering news stories around the city and on their own doorstep.

Among the subjects of their audio, video and text reports are the planned new shopping centre at Cabot Circus, the redevelopment of their own school, its links with schools in Uganda and the restoration of masts on Brunel's SS Great Britain.

Their BBC mentor, Stephen Lamb, said children had interviewed key people involved with the school redevelopment project and some of the restorers who had been working up the masts of Brunel's landmark ship.

"It has been an extraordinary day, and they have all been very enthusiastic," he said.

1232 :: POLTAIR PUPILS TURN FASHION DESIGNERS

Students at Poltair School
Students discussed a competition to design a new school uniform

It is the 100th anniversary of Poltair School and to celebrate students have been given the chance to design a new school uniform.

Now the competition is down to a few designs and there is a lot of debate about which is best.

School Reporters have been asking teachers what they think.

"It's really really interesting and I've gained leadership skills from being the news editor. I chose the uniform story because it's been important to the students for a long time," Emily, 14, said.

1223 :: BOYCIE'S KISS AND TELL

John Challis meets Wigmore High Schools students
Students interviewed the actor at their school

Actor John Challis, best known for playing Boycie in the TV sitcom Only Fools and Horses, has answered students' questions about memorable moments from his career.

The actor revealed his worst moment came when he was asked to do his first onscreen kiss.

Challis told Jake and Simon from Wigmore High School in the West Midlands that he would have preferred it if he'd hadn't been asked to kiss another man.

The kiss was for the TV show Green, Green Grass.

Jake and Simon both enjoyed their first experience of conducting an interview. Simon said: "I didn't really think about it (working in the media) before, but I think I might like to do it now."

1217 :: ROCK STAR WANTS END TO BULLYING

Lil' Chris
The Rock School star held a press conference with the students

Teen rock star Lil' Chris says if he could change one thing in the world it would be to end bullying.

The singer made the revelation during an interview on the BBC School Report webcast.

He was being interviewed by pupils from four Manchester schools who are putting together their own news reports with the help of BBC staff.

Lil' Chris also revealed his biggest hero is fellow rocker and former Darkness frontman Justin Hawkins who's also from Lowestoft and went to the same school.

Watch the interview here:

1206 :: LONDON'S GANG CULTURE AND DR WHO

Elm Court Special School
Students reported on gang culture in the capital

The recent spate of stabbings in London has prompted pupils from Elm Court Special School in London to report on gang culture in the capital.

Six pupils in Year 8 have split into three groups and will also be reporting on the amount of money allocated to the Ministry of Defence announced in the Budget.

On a lighter note they are recording a report on news that Dr Who will be returning for a fourth series next year.

1205 :: STUDENTS MEET TONY BLAIR

Students from Tile Hill Wood, Lyng Hall and Hartshill Technology College, in Coventry, have interviewed Prime Minister Tony Blair.

They travelled to London to carry out the interview in Downing Street.

They appeared outside the prime minister's house live on BBC News 24 and described it as a "once in a lifetime experience".

The full interview will be available here from 1400 GMT.

1202 :: COOMBESHEAD COLLEGE GOES GREEN

School reporters at Coombeshead College have been quizzing people from Sustainability Southwest who launched an eco website at their school today.

Radio, TV and internet School Reporters have been asking "Will it work?"

Andy, 13, said: "I'm a radio presenter ... ten minutes ago I was at the press conference. It was very professional with cameras and wires everywhere!"

1200 :: BREAKING NEWS FROM INDIA

After receiving an email, Villiers High School's overseas correspondent, Suraj, 12, has had to change his plans to spend the past two days gathering as much information as he can about the unrest in Calcutta.

Pupils from their link school in Calcutta were due to have a video conference into this morning's news conference, but the school in India has been closed due to a general strike and rioting in Calcutta.

Farmers in West Bengal are up in arms over being made to give up farm land to an international chemical company.

1155 :: 'NOT ALL KIDS ARE BAD ON MY ESTATE'

School Reporter Matthew has been investigating the behaviour and treatment of teenagers on the Chantry estate, Ipswich, where he lives.

It is the lead story for a news programme produced by students at Chantry High School.

Matthew, 13, said some young people on the estate have little to do, leading to behaviour such as scrawling graffiti or kicking footballs at shop windows.

But it means locals can unfairly think all teenagers behave badly.

He said: "Because I like to wear a tracksuit they think I'm like that. If I'm with my mates, people say 'don't cause any trouble.' It makes me feel like I'm not an individual."

Students have suggested one solution to the problem of anti-social behaviour. They say the estate needs a youth club and an indoor sports centre where they can play football safely indoors.

1150 :: HANDS-ON RESEARCH FOR NI STUDENTS

Pupils at Limavady High School in Northern Ireland are getting a taste of a newsroom at the Verbal Arts Centre, where they are researching stories at a large computer hub in the Londonderry facility.

"I think it's really good," said Lauren, 12. "I like computers and I'm learning a lot."

The students are working on radio pieces and have divided their reporting into different subjects, as a real newsroom does.

Entertainment is popular - they have already researched several potential stories including the Jackson Five reforming into a band, and Britney Spears and Justin Timberlake singing a duet.

1147 :: TIME ON AIR FOR GOOD BEHAVIOUR

A so-called "failing school", which was transformed in record time, is reaping the rewards for the endeavours of staff and pupils.

Year 8 children at Duston School in Northampton have been whisked into BBC radio studios for live interviews, with experts teaching them the secrets of broadcasting while preparing for their own web broadcasts later today.

Teacher Louise Symonds says their lead story is the visit of an American delegation which pioneered the behavioural system that the school now employs.

Since Duston introduced Consistency Management and Co-operative Discipline, the number of discipline problems and exclusions has fallen significantly.

It is based on the idea of positive praise, practised by many schools around the world but by few in the UK.

Miss Symonds said a new management team was brought in by the government after it was put on "special measures", and the tag was removed again within 14 weeks - a record, according to the teacher.

1145 :: OLD BOY TEACHES NEW TRICKS

Greenwood Dale
Pupils were fascinated by Robert Stubley's steel dragon

A class of 12- and 13-year-olds invited a locally renowned sculptor into their school - and discovered he used to be one of them!

When Robert Stubley turned up at Greenwood Dale school in Nottingham with his stainless steel dragon, it proved a fascinating talking point for the 25 Year 8 pupils.

But it was even more of a surprise when he revealed that he had attended the school himself 40 years earlier.

Deputy head teacher Mike Hamlin revealed: "He told them how things had changed quite a bit since his day."

The youngsters have already conducted several live interviews, and are hoping their local MP, John Heppell, will join them later today for an in-depth political grilling.

"We shall ask him about the implications of the Budget for education and about the change in school-leaving age," said Mr Hamlin.

1136 :: STUDENTS INVESTIGATE NEW CENTRE

The building of a new enterprise centre was the subject of investigation by students at Longsands College in St Neots, Cambridgeshire.

The enterprise centre will be used for teaching business skills at the school, and is part of a long-term plan to replace all the school's buildings.

The condition of some of the buildings at Longsands has been described as "shabby."

School Reporters have filmed a video podcast about the project.

1127 :: BBC SCOTLAND'S HOMEPAGE

BBC Scotland homepage

BBC Scotland have gone for the retro look for the prominent promotion being given to their School Report coverage, with a stylish blackboard picture stretched across the page.

There's no competition to solve the maths problem posed in the chalk, but there are links to the main School Report website, to the listen live option for Radio Scotland and to the education section.

1125 :: DOUBLE TROUBLE FOR SNP'S SALMOND

Maree and Karen from Inverness Royal Academy
The twins grilled SNP leader Alex Salmond about global warming

SNP leader Alex Salmond faced double trouble when he was put on the spot by identical twins Maree and Karen, 13.

Their "good cop, bad cop" interviewing technique paid dividends as the MP was given a grilling about global warming and the size of his carbon footprint.

"He would not stop talking, which was good," Inverness Royal Academy School Report news editor Maree said.

"But we would also have liked to have been able to fit more questions into our 15-minute slot."

1120 :: READING SCHOOL'S FOOTBALL FOCUS

Reading School news team
Reading School news team hard at work

The nice and nasty sides of football are being probed by School Reporters at Reading School.

Year 8 students reported on an increase in violence among parent spectators at children's Sunday league matches.

They also interviewed Reading FC's Ecuadorean international defender Ulises De La Cruz about why he gives 20% of his wages to charity.

A story about how a colossal squid caught in the Antarctic last month could be defrosted in a giant microwave has also prompted school reporters to speak to catering staff about the oddest creature they've ever had to cook.

Tej, 13, added: "We've interviewed sixth formers about plans to increase the school leaving age, and we're writing about a local bus fares rise."

1118 :: ANTARCTIC SCIENTIST SEES HISTORY IN THE ICE

A scientist has returned from the South Pole to meet students at Parkside Community College, Cambridge.

Climatologist Georgina Miles talked about her work with the British Antarctic Survey, whose headquarters are in Cambridge.

Students interviewed Georgina about her studies of carbon dioxide levels in ice core samples taken from underneath the surface of the Antarctic.

One of the interviewers was Claire, 13. She said: "Georgina can tell when different things happened in the past, such as the industrial revolution, just by looking at the carbon dioxide in the ice."

The recording was to be used in a radio programme produced by Parkside students. They wanted to cover climate change and young people's opinions on it.

1115 :: SLAVE DESCENDANT REPORTS ON ABOLITION

A student reporting on the anniversary of the abolition of the slave trade is herself descended from slaves.

Lois, aged 13, from Eltham Hill Technology College for Girls in London will be reporting on the 200th anniversary of the Abolition of the Slave Trade Act.

It is part of a TV bulletin which also covers the issues of climate change as it affects the school, depleted fish stocks, the rebuilding of the school, and the death of Pakistan cricket coach Bob Woolmer.

1112 :: PUPILS TAKE OVER BBC RADIO STOKE

Students at St Thomas More
Students are broadcasting their news on BBC Radio Stoke

BBC Radio Stoke is being "taken over" by pupils as part of BBC News School Report.

Children from St Thomas More Catholic College in Longton, Stoke-on-Trent, are reading the news, producing pieces for programmes and taking turns as presenters on air.

They are compiling their own bulletins which are going out on the half-hour through the day.

One of the newsreaders, James, told School Report: "It's an interesting experience. The first bulletin I was really nervous. When I was practising I made a few mistakes, but I've not made any on air".

1055 :: ENGLAND'S PROSPECTS IN ISRAEL?

Pupils at London's Hackney Free and Parochial School are planning to talk to the editor of football magazine Shoot Monthly about England's prospects in the Euro 2008 qualifying match against Israel on Saturday.

They are also interviewing Mayor Jules Pipe about the thorny issue of school places in Hackney for a webcast.

He will also be quizzed on a project to plant more trees in the borough's school grounds.

1045 :: STUDENTS TACKLE ANTI-SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR

Pre-prepared material from schools across the UK will be broadcast throughout the day.

BBC radio reporter Andrew Bomford watched as students from Knutsford High School extracted a promise from the local council and the police to consult them in the future about play facilities on a local housing estate.

Children on the Longridge Estate have been complaining that they have nothing to do and nowhere to play, and this leads to anti-social behaviour and crime.

School Reports interviewed a senior official from the local council and the local police inspector, who both promised to engage the children in more dialogue in the future.

The children also recorded the council official, Marlyn Kerby, talking to children on the estate about making improvements to a local skateboarding park.

Their report will be broadcast on the PM programme on Radio 4 tonight.

1035 :: STUDENTS OUTSIDE DOWNING ST

Students from Coventry schools Tile Hill Wood, Lyng Hall and Hartshill Technology College are preparing to meet Prime Minister Tony Blair.

The students appeared outside Downing Street in London, live on BBC News 24.

They will meet with Mr Blair at around 1110 GMT.

1031 :: SCHOOL INVESTIGATES LOCAL SLAVERY LINKS

On the 200th anniversary of the abolition of the slave trade, School Reporters at Haggerston School in London are finding out how the local community was involved with the milestone.

Pupils are planning a trip to the Hackney Museum to find out more and interview a local expert.

Saskie, 13, said: "This morning we've been on the internet checking background information on the subject".

They also hope to interview a representative from the British Museum about the talk Nelson Mandela is giving there on Sunday.

1030 :: WATER DAY AND WASTE IN CAMDEN

Camden School for Girls are making a TV bulletin leading with International Water Day.

They have an exclusive interview with Conservative MP Anne Milton on the issue of size-zero models, the launch of Playstation 3 and the queues of people waiting to buy it.

Amira, aged 13, is part of the team investigating rubbish collection in Camden.

She has contacted Camden Council for a comment and hopes to go out and ask people whether they support fortnightly collections.

"It's very important - it will affect the streets of London," she said.

1025 :: RECYCLING THE NEWS

Pupils from Clapton Girls Technology College in London want to demonstrate their green credentials for School Report.

They are looking at Hackney Council's scheme to recycle aluminium and buy trees to plant with the money raised in the borough.

Pupils will also be filming at their own school where 30 trees are being planted in the staff garden.

1021 :: PUPILS PROBE ASYLUM SEEKER'S CASE

School Reporters at Shawlands Academy in Glasgow are working on a breaking news story about one of their fellow pupils who is facing deportation.

A petition to help the 14-year-old Turkish girl, who does not want to be named, is circulating at the school.

Joint editors, Mark and Krishan, both 13, are deploying their investigative reporters, Jordan and Robbie, both 13.

"I have told them to ask the headmaster about why this is happening and what he thinks about it," Mark said.

1020 :: GOING GREEN IN GLOUCESTERSHIRE

A 28m plan to rebuild dilapidated Rednock School in Dursley as an eco-friendly role model is being investigated by Year 8 School Reporters.

New designs will see the school's main building feature a "green" roof seeded with plants, which will catch and filter rain water for use in the toilets, and a biomass boiler for heating.

A dozen pupils are preparing radio reports which will be broadcast today at 1400 GMT.

They have interviewed headmaster David Alexander, environment minister Parmjit Dhanda, as well as fellow students on what they think of the project.

George, 13, has also been working on a Sports section for the programme.

"We're doing stories on the new Wembley Stadium, the death of Pakistan cricket coach Bob Woolmer and the school football team, who've got through to the next stage of the national cup," he said.

1018 :: PUPILS QUIZ MP ON CRIME AND RACISM

MP Karen Buck has been answering hard-hitting questions about crime, racism and the issue of size-zero models.

Year 8 pupils at Quintin Kynaston school in London are busy editing three TV reports for the 1400 GMT deadline. They then plan to upload them onto their website.

They interviewed the Labour MP for Regent's Park and Kensington North on Tuesday at the House of Commons.

If they have time they will also put together a report on government proposals to raise the school leaving age to 18.

1015 :: FROM SOMALIA TO SNOWY WEATHER

Pupils at Sion Manning RC Girls' School in London are preparing a broad range of radio reports, from fighting in Somalia to today's weather.

They have split into three groups and plan to cover international, local, sports news and the weather.

An issue that touches them in particular is government plans to raise the school-leaving age to 18.

1010 :: PUPILS RE-WRITE SCHOOL MENU

School Reporters at Brentside High School in London are taking their head teacher to task over his new healthy eating plan.

Head teacher Arwel Jones has been promoting salads and pasta options as part of the school's drive to make pupils healthier.

But mentor Helen Wade says the new food and drink policy doesn't seem to be going down well: "They are all clamouring for chips and I'm told children are still bringing fizzy drinks to school."

1005 :: HULL STUDENTS GATHER IDEAS

Cottingham High School students are preparing for their morning editorial meeting.

There are 24 students who have divided into groups to look at local, national and international news and sport.

Their reporting is going to be very much "on the day" so the atmosphere is buzzing as they bounce around their early ideas.

1000 :: STUDENTS TO TACKLE EDUCATION PLANS

Students at Charles Edward Brooke School in Lambeth are about to find out what their classmates think of government plans to make staying on at school to the age of 18 compulsory.

They are preparing a radio bulletin focusing on Education Secretary Alan Johnson's proposals, which are due to be unveiled at lunchtime.

As well as their fellow pupils, the School Reporters will also be interviewing their head teacher.

0955 :: EAST YORKSHIRE SCHOOL BRAINSTORMS

The South Hunsley School hit the ground running this morning, having already been on the local radio station before most reporting was underway.

The students are now coming up with topics that interest them - one team of young reporters is covering the dangers caused by a major road works being built near the school.

Hannah, 13, said: "It's nice to be doing something different that's interesting."

0945 :: SPORTS REPORTERS HIT EARLY SNAG

Pupils at Deptford Green School in London are busy researching sports stories for a TV bulletin.

Already they have hit a snag - many of the pieces they want to cover have copyrighted pictures they cannot use.

But their mentor Andy Brown says it's a valuable lesson for his would-be journalists.

0939 :: BUDGET AND BRITNEY MAKE THE NEWS

Chancellor Gordon Brown and Britney Spears look set to feature on the BBC News School Report webcast.

Students from Trinity Church of England High School in Manchester have chosen the Chancellor's Budget and reports that the pop star is coming out of rehab for their news bulletin.

The school's entertainment reporter Jennifer told School Report the Britney Spears story was "interesting because she started her career when she was quite young".

But it's not all serious, viewers are also promised a story about what your hair colour says about you.

0915 :: US STUDENTS GET TYNESIDE SCHOOL SINGING ALONG

BBC Breakfast news reporter Sarah Campbell watched as Marden High School students led their bulletin with a report about a group of American performing arts students who were visiting the school.

The Year 8 students at the North Tyneside school were pleased with the results.

"There were lots of soloists on the stage so filming was quite difficult, but we did ok," said Jamie.

0910 :: LINCOLN STUDENTS GEAR UP

Students at the City of Lincoln Community College are setting up their equipment and having a final read-through of their scripts, in preparation for School Report day.

There are 12 students working with the BBC Lincolnshire bus team to produce news packages on the topics of healthy eating, homelessness and activities for young people.

For the healthy eating report they will be interviewing a dinner lady and quizzing their peers about the fact that they are only allowed chips on a Friday!

0905 :: HUW EDWARD'S TOP TIPS

BBC TV News presenter Huw Edwards gives his top tips to School Reporters taking part in the day.

He reminds students to use the five W's in their reports:

These are:
Who, What, When, Where and Why

0900 :: SCHOOL REPORT IS NOW LIVE!

You can watch the webcast on the School Report website on the link below:

Or by pressing the red button on your TV and selecting the news multiscreen.

0845 :: TABLE TURNED AS REPORTER QUIZZED

School Reporters at Marden High School, North Tyneside, had to interrupt their morning news meeting to be interviewed themselves - live on BBC Breakfast.

The School Report team's weather presenter Sam, 13, was one of those picked to face the BBC's camera crew.

Sam, who is now on his way to record a weather report while riding on the Shields Ferry, said he had become used to being in front of a camera.

"But it is a bit different being interviewed live on national TV."

0830 :: OLYMPIC HOPEFULS TO HIT HEADLINES

Four Olympic hopefuls at William Howard School have been interviewed by their schoolmates for a package broadcast on BBC Radio Cumbria's breakfast show.

Synchronised swimmer Vanessa, 16, rower Kayleigh, 17, cyclist Tom, 16, and badminton champion Lauren, 15, spoke about their hopes and dreams for 2012.

The package was recorded and edited by William Howard's School Reporters.

And the school's head of personal development, Ellen Mothersdale, said it had sounded "absolutely fantastic".

0800 :: ADVICE TO SCHOOLS ON MAIN STORY OF THE DAY

You may already be aware, but there is a national news story for you to cover if you wish this morning - the unveiling of government plans to encourage young people to continue with school or training until they are 18.

More of what we know so far can be found on the link below:

But further details will come out after 1000 GMT when the proposals are due to be published.

Otherwise, just a reminder that although there are quite a lot of court stories around today we advise you stay clear of them.

Court reporting should only be done by trained reporters present during the court proceedings.



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