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Last Updated: Wednesday, 20 February 2008, 10:20 GMT
Classic Question Times
You can watch again some of the special and memorable editions of Question Time.

In particular there is a special highlights edition which was produced to celebrate the programme's 25th anniversary in 2004.

Also listed below and available to watch online are a number of other special programmes, such as the ground-breaking edition from China, programmes put together by the winning pupils of the Schools Question Time challenge, and the 2005 general election debate featuring all three main party leaders.

HOW TO WATCH
All the videos on this page can be watched in broadband (UK only) or narrowband, and with Windows Media Player or RealPlayer. Your computer will either automatically recognise your settings or prompt you to select your preferences.

BEST OF QUESTION TIME - 16 SEPT 2004

Ian Hislop and Mary Archer


A special anniversary programme to celebrate 25 years of Question Time put together highlights of the series from over the years since it was first aired in 1979.

The programme includes political heavyweights such as Michael Heseltine, Tony Benn, Ken Clarke and Shirley Williams as well as iconic figures such as Arthur Scargill, Edwina Currie and Boris Johnson.

Some of the most powerful contributions are from members of the public speaking from the audience and taking a politician to task. There are also show-stealing moments from the programme's long-time presenter Robin Day.

Alongside the passionate arguments, revelations and blunders, some of the most electric moments are the confrontations between the panellists. And Ian Hislop's confrontation with Mary Archer in a 2002 edition of Question Time was chosen as the favourite moment by Question Time viewers in a poll here at the website.

SCHOOLS QUESTION TIME - 5 JULY 2007

Students from the 2007 Schools Challenge


For the fourth year running, a team of school pupils worked with David Dimbleby and the Question Time team to produce a special edition of the programme.

The studio audience was aged between 16 and 22 years. The students also set out to find a young person aged 16-22 to appear on the panel and represent young people.

The 18-year-old winner of the Schools Question Time panellist competition Charlie Bell appeared alongside Ed Miliband, Sayeeda Warsi, Davina McCall and Douglas Murray.

IRAQ SPECIAL - 22 MARCH 2007

Former US ambassador to the UN John Bolton

Four years after the US-led invasion of Iraq, Question Time produced a special edition of the programme which discussed the issues surrounding Iraq.

David Dimbleby was joined for the debate by Defence Secretary Des Browne MP, Conservative shadow defence secretary Liam Fox MP, former leader of the Liberal Democrats Charles Kennedy MP, former US ambassador to the UN John Bolton, former prime minister of Pakistan Benazir Bhutto and president of the Stop the War coalition Tony Benn.

The panel debated whether the world is a safer place since the fall of Saddam Hussein, if President George W Bush's decision to send extra troops will improve the situation in Iraq and how history will judge the war.

SCHOOLS QUESTION TIME 2006 - 6 JULY 2006

Students from the 2006 competition



For the third year running a team of school pupils worked with David Dimbleby and the Question Time team to produce a special edition of the programme.

The students decided on an audience aged 21 and under. And they put a young member of the public on the panel after a competition asking people to apply via mobile phone video.

Twenty-year-old student Matt Pollard impressed in the TV auditions to win the competition and appeared alongside David Miliband MP, Richard Madeley, Lord Coe and Julia Goldsworthy MP.

One of the student producers, 18-year-old Geraint Faulkner from Ysgol Gyfun Emlyn in Carmarthenshire said: "We wanted to find an original way of making sure that young people's voices were represented not only in the audience but on the panel."

TORY LEADERSHIP DEBATE - 3 NOVEMBER 2005

David Cameron and David Davis


The two contenders for the Conservative leadership, David Cameron and David Davis, were questioned by members of the public in a special edition of the programme.

They appeared together throughout the hour-long, unedited show, having agreed to take part in principle shortly after the results of the MPs' ballot were announced two weeks previously.

The timing of the broadcast was critical, as the following morning ballot papers were sent out to the 300,000 Conservative party members who would elect the leader.

Around half of the live studio audience were Conservatives, with the remainder drawn proportionately from the rest of the electorate, providing a broad range of views. The audience was also balanced between those who thought David Davis or David Cameron would be the better leader of the Conservative party.

QUESTION TIME IN AFRICA - 7 JULY 2005

Morgan Tsvangirai


In the week of the G8 conference in Scotland and the Live 8 concert, Question Time came from Johannesburg in South Africa.

The programme focussed on some of the major issues facing Africa including poverty, debt relief, Aids and the continent's cultural importance and influence.

But the bombings in London earlier that day inevitably dominated the debate.

The panel included British cabinet minister and former international development secretary Baroness Amos, Zimbabwean opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai, South African political commentator Moeletski Mbeki, foreign minister of Somaliland Edna Ismail, and anti-poverty campaigner Bianca Jagger.

SCHOOLS QUESTION TIME 2005 - 30 JUNE 2005

David Dimbleby and student producers


For the second year running, pupils from schools around the country took on key production roles to produce an entire edition of Question Time.

The Schools Question Time Challenge was in partnership with BT and the Institute for Citizenship. From the entries to the competition, judges chose 12 finalist schools which were each given a £500 cash grant and professional support to stage a Question Time-style event at their school.

Preparations continued throughout the year culminating in the final programme made by eight pupils (two from each of the four winning schools), broadcast in its usual slot on BBC One.

The students chose an unusual strategy for their audience, restricting applications to the over 50s and under 25s, hoping to provoke a dialogue between the generations.

QUESTION TIME IN PARIS - 26 MAY 2005

EU flag


Three days ahead of the French referendum on the EU constitution, Question Time was in Paris for a special edition.

Despite President Chirac's frantic campaign for a French Yes, opinion polls were showing the No vote ahead at that time.

Senior French and British politicians on both sides of the argument joined the debate.

David Dimbleby was joined by UMP Vice President Hervé Mariton, Jacques Myard of the UMP coalition, former Europe Minister Denis MacShane MP, Shadow Foreign Secretary Liam Fox MP, Green Party MEP Caroline Lucas, and pro-European comedian Eddie Izzard.

GENERAL ELECTION SPECIAL - 28 APRIL 2005

Tony Blair, Michael Howard and Charles Kennedy


The three main party leaders faced a live TV audience in a unique programme just before the general election.

Charles Kennedy, Michael Howard and Tony Blair appeared in turn, each for nearly 30 minutes.

The SNP and Plaid Cymru leaders also appeared in half-hour programmes in Scotland and Wales the next day.

While the leaders did not agree to a US-style presidential debate, after some negotiation the production team's alternative format was accepted.

This was a step forward from the previous general election when each of the leaders appeared in their own separate edition of Question Time.

QUESTION TIME IN CHINA - 10 MARCH 2005

The Question Time audience in Shanghai


As part of the BBC's China Week, an extraordinary edition of Question Time was staged in a ground-breaking and unique moment for the relationship between the largest remaining Communist country and the Western media.

The audience in Shanghai was able to interact with a panel including a spokesman for the Chinese government, Liu Jianchao, as well as critical voices.

Other panellists were the former governor of Hong Kong Chris Patten, entrepreneur David Tang, General Secretary of the Boao Forum Long Yongtu and writer Isabel Hilton.

The debate covered subjects including human rights in China and the possible development of democracy in Hong Kong.

The programme was recorded just hours after the resignation of Hong Kong's leader Tung Chee-hwa.

US ELECTION SPECIAL - 28 OCT 2004

Michael Moore


Five days before the 2004 US presidential election, Question Time had a special American edition of the programme from Florida.

The Oscar-winning director Michael Moore, who directed of the anti-Bush polemic Fahrenheit 9/11, appeared alongside David Frum, the man behind President Bush's phrase "axis of evil".

Also on the panel were the former advisor to President Clinton Sidney Blumenthal, and Richard Littlejohn, outspoken columnist for Britain's biggest circulation daily newspaper, the Sun.

There was a particularly vocal live studio audience. The final panellist Lida Rodriguez-Taseff, chair of the Miami-Dade Electoral Reform Coalition, was met by boos when she said: "Sadly we cannot trust the election result if it is close".

The programme's location in Miami marked its status as one of the key swing states to determine the outcome of the election, following Florida's controversial re-count in the previous election four years earlier.



SEE ALSO
A question of citizenship
01 Jul 05 |  Question Time
Question Time for party leaders
28 Apr 05 |  Election 2005
Chinese audience joins TV debate
10 Mar 05 |  Question Time
Question Time in the USA
02 Nov 04 |  Question Time


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