BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Programmes: Panorama: Programme Updates  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Programme Updates
Horse racing
Racing could be policed by an independent body
The Jockey Club looks set to lose its role as the policeman of horse racing after a meeting between officials from the club and sports minister Richard Caborn.

The talks - just two weeks after Panorama's Corruption of Racing programme - pave the way for wholesale changes in the way the 5bn a year sport is governed.

The Jockey Club, which has been in sole charge of enforcing the rules of racing for 250 years, has agreed to come up with recommendations on how the industry could be better vetted.

The most likely proposal will be a brand new body with wide ranging powers to enforce the Rules of Racing.

Independent

Richard Caborn MP
We need an independent regulator - Richard Caborn
However, it will probably not signal the end of the Jockey Club altogether, as the new organisation will continue to use the club's staff and experience.

The Club's PR director John Maxse said the organisation would be happy to work with Mr Caborn to develop proposals to "increase independence."

Although whether the Minister for Sport will be happy to have the Jockey Club retained in some capacity is another matter.

Mr Caborn said the new policeman for the sport would have to be free of bodies like the Jockey Club.

Constructive

He had made it clear that something had to be done, saying: "There is a consensus emerging that something had to happen and there needs to be independence and transparency in the regulation and dispensing of discipline."

Mr Caborn also praised the Jockey Club in a statement, for their professionalism of the work it had undertaken in the past and for recognising that chance was needed.

Christopher Spence, chief executive of the Jockey Club described the meeting as "very constructive".

Mr Maxse, added: "We have been given the task of coming up with proposals and if we don't go far enough, I am sure they will tell us."


The Investigation

The Court cases

Profiles

The Jockey Club




Forum

E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Programme Updates stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes