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Gap and Nike: No Sweat?
Sunday October 15 2000
Reporter Paul Kenyon
Producer Fiona Campbell
Assistant Producer Esella Hawkey



Paul Kenyon answered your questions on the issues raised in Gap and Nike: No Sweat? in a live webcast. Click on the link below to watch coverage of the forum
Video56K
Paul Kenyon returned to Cambodia to check on the young girls featured in the investigation into a factory used by the Gap and Nike.
Panorama reveals that Gap and Nike have been using a factory in Cambodia which breaks their own strict codes of conduct and anti-sweatshop rules.

Scroll down for related links

The two hugely successful international brands claim that regular monitoring ensures that most factories are free of unethical working practices.

However, the Panorama team uncovered sweat-shop working conditions and child labour at the June Textiles factory within days of arriving in Cambodia.

I didn't want to come here - But we're very poor so I had to come

Sun Thyda, 12
Paul Kenyon spoke to two girls who work in the factory used by both Gap and Nike. They are both under fifteen, the legal working age in Cambodia.

Twelve year-old Sun Thyda lied about her age to get the job. She says "I didn't want to come here. But we're very poor so I had to come."

Todd McKean
Nike spokesman Todd McKean
Nike spokesman Todd McKean says "unfortunately we've found on occasion in different places isolated instances (of child labour) which I would say this is isolated."

The programme speaks to six other girls about their working conditions. All work seven days a week, often up to sixteen hours a day.

Nike and the Gap told Panorama they were working with the factory to improve conditions. Nike now say they may pull out altogether in December.

Neil Kearney
Neil Kearney is unconvinced by company claims
Neil Kearney of the International Textile, Garment and Leather Worker's Federation believes monitoring can be improved.

He says "They insist on high standards as far as quality is concerned. There's absolutely no reason why they cannot insist on the same standards for working conditions."

Nike has made assurances that any children found working will be paid to go to school. But Gap spokesperson Ira Puspawedi holds a different view. She said "Let them go because we cannot tolerate under-age workers working in our factories. That is our standard."

Related links

Consumer advice from Save The Children UK

Nike

Gap

Ethical Trading Initiative

Clean Clothes Campaign

Community Aid Abroad - The NikeWatch Campaign

Global Exchange - Anti-Sweatshop Campaign

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
Gap And Nike: No Sweat?
Paul Kenyon contrasts working conditions with the retailers' codes of conduct
Gap And Nike: No Sweat?
Gap and Nike defend their monitoring programmes

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