Help
BBC OnePanorama

MORE PROGRAMMES

Page last updated at 14:36 GMT, Thursday, 11 September 2008 15:36 UK

Omagh relatives speak of their anger

Omagh bombing scene

In the wake of the Omagh bombing in which 29 people died, both the UK and Irish governments promised that "no stone would be left unturned" in trying to put the culprits behind bars.

But after a decade of police inquiries on both sides of the Irish border failing to do this, many of the relatives of those killed, and people who were caught up in the attack have lost faith in the criminal justice system.

BERNIE DOHERTY, MOTHER OF ORAN DOHERTY (AGED EIGHT)

"I'd wonder why, why is there still no-one held to account for what they've done, and they always said they knew them and I don't see why they can't get the evidence together they need. I would have no faith now. I don't really listen to anything like that anymore."

CAROL RADFORD, SISTER OF ALAN RADFORD (AGED 16)

"We were assured that everything would be done and everything was getting done to bring these people to justice. And nothing is being done, you know. I was very naive in the beginning, but as I say, I've had the education of a lifetime. And I now see things now, have been shown things, for the way they are. I believe that a deal was done with the Real IRA, and that nobody, nobody was ever going to be brought to justice for this."

ELIZABETH GIBSON, SISTER OF ESTHER GIBSON (AGED 36)

"Everything was promised to us, that they would help us, that they would help each other... as in the South and in the North. But again we've seen that they haven't helped each other. They've done probably the opposite on occasions. And you do get fed up going to these meetings and hearing the same thing and the same promises, that something's going to be done and nothing was done and 10 years later, well, what has been done?"

GERRY MCFARLAND, FATHER OF SAMANTHA MCFARLAND (AGED 17)

"I would imagine, even those that are convicted, that some time in their lives, they say 'well, I deserved that, I shouldn't have been doing what I did.' but it restores that faith in the judicial system whereby, you know that it's explicitly for one thing and that is to ensure it is truth and justice. That hasn't happened."

GODFREY WILSON, FATHER OF LORRAINE WILSON (AGED 15)

"When my daughter Denise put it to Tony Blair, 'You know, my father has lost his daughter, and my mother has lost a daughter, and I have lost my sister, and we all loved her very much, you know, tell me now, what are you going to do as the prime minister of Great Britain?' And he turned around and said: 'What can I do? I'm only the prime minister'... to hear them words disheartened me. It told me that the man was the prime minister of Great Britain but didn't have the will-power to fight this."

KEVIN SKELTON, HUSBAND OF PHILOMENA SKELTON (AGED 49)

"I feel very betrayed and let down by the security forces on both sides of the border. And today, my opinion is, there will never be anybody convicted. I don't think anybody wants anybody convicted for the Omagh bomb."

LAURENCE RUSH, HUSBAND OF ELIZABETH RUSH (AGED 57)

"I haven't got a gravestone on my wife's grave. Because until I get justice, that's when I say she's buried, you know? And I'm not ready for closure. I seek justice."

MICHAEL GALLAGHER, FATHER OF ADRIAN GALLAGHER (AGED 21)

"It didn't look like there was a will to bring those before the courts that were responsible for Omagh and all we can say about that as families is that there was not the political will to do that... Listening recently to police officers on both sides of the border, I think they're very capable officers. I think they had the ability to put these people behind bars so you must ask yourself 'why?' And the only reason that we can come up with is that there was not the political will to do so."

STANLEY MCCOMBE, HUSBAND OF ANNE MCCOMBE (AGED 48)

"Promises is promises, but I mean there's not a department in the British government, nor the Northern Ireland government, that didn't promise us... everybody promised us, but nobody delivered. Nobody has delivered... I'm very angry. And it changes your whole outlook on the justice system, and the policing in this country, and, too, in Southern Ireland."

MARY ELLIS, INJURED IN THE BOMBING

"Well, one of the police said that they would definitely get someone, that he wouldn't rest till he would get someone. But yet it's 10 years on and he's got nobody. So I don't think they'll ever get anyone."

Panorama: Omagh - What the Police Were Never Told will be broadcast on BBC One at 8.30pm on Monday 15 September.



RELATED BBC LINKS


FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit


banner watch listen bbc sport Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific