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Panorama
The cricketers
Henry Olonga
Henry Olonga's famous black armband protest
Henry Olonga and team-mate Andy Flower, have been living in fear since wearing black armbands in protest at the "death of democracy" in their homeland during the Cricket World Cup.

Henry Olonga

Henry Olonga, Zimbabwe's first black international cricketer, had been the perfect role model for the Zimbabwean government.

But he has become an outcast since the famous protest, being branded a traitor by the Mugabe regime. He has fled Zimbabwe and says he can never go back.

The fast bowler, one of five children born to Dr John Alonga, has now retired from international cricket in his 20s.

He said: "If I were to continue to play for Zimbabwe in the midst of the prevailing crisis," he says, "I would do so only by neglecting the voice of my conscience."

His father was born in Kenya, trained as a doctor in the UK and moved to Zambia in the early 1960s. This is where Henry was born.

The family moved to Zimbabwe to help ease the shortage of doctors in the country after many white people left after independence in 1979.

At school, Henry excelled not only at athletics, cricket and rugby, but also at art and music. In fact, he had a number one song in the Zimbabwe charts in 2000 and was featured singing on a BBC sport programme.

Andy Flower

Flower makes his protest
Andy Flower
Andy Flower was born in Cape Town, South Africa, although his family roots lie in Zimbabwe.

His family returned to the country when he was young and he became a prolific cricketer at school level, averaging over 100 runs an innings for Harare's North Park School.

He made his first-class debut at the age of 18, for a President's XI against the West Indies, scoring 13 runs.

Andy left Zimbabwe after leaving school to play in England and Holland, where he made appearances for West Bromwich Dartmouth and for Voorburg Cricket Club in The Hague.

The wicket-keeping batsman made his first appearance for Zimbabwe in a tour match against Lancashire in the early 1990s.

He then appeared in every single one day match for his country for more than a decade and was Zimbabwe captain for several years.

He has also retired from international cricket as a result of the protests, but is still playing first class cricket with Essex.

His brother Grant Flower still plays for the national side.

Panorama: Five days in May

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