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Send us your comments
Panorama: Promises, Promises was broadcast on BBC One at 2215 GMT on Sunday, 16 February, 2003.

We will post your comments on this page from approx 2300 GMT on Sunday, 16 February.

However because of the high volume of correspondence we receive, we cannot guarantee to post every single e-mail. Have your say

Some of your comments so far:

Industry and commerce relies on transport. Without it goods and materials can't get to the users and customers can't get to shops. Nor can doctors, nurses and patients get to the new hospitals.

When are we going to get a Chancellor of the Exchequer with the wit to realise that transport has been ignored for far too long and requires serious and sustained investment? Not just for a year or two, but for 10 or 20 years.
Roger Voggers, England

Your programme mentioned lots of rail projects that got delayed in England - however there are major problems throughout most of Scotland as well.

The Edinburgh-Glasgow line has been acting up after last years "weather" and if you take the East Coast from Edinburgh to Aberdeen, the train seems to run at 35mph after Dundee, thus increasing travel time.
Paul Heuvelmans, UK

I like many millions have to suffer the poor quality and punctuality of our transport services daily. Not only are the buses and tubes in deteriorating conditions, they are smelly, the drivers are rude and the overcrowding and waiting times are unbearable.

Instead of trying to sort out the world's problems, Tony Blair should spend some quality time sorting out [transport]

Paul Huxstep, England
It puzzles many why the UK is termed a "developed" country. The politicians and the private companies that run the broken networks make promises to make things better. But they do not actually have to use public transport day in and day out.
David, London, UK

The congestion problem is due to the fact that many train ticket prices are twice the petrol price of a car for the same journey. More Roads are not the answer. I remember that the M25 was meant to relieve congestion. Has it?
David Breakwell, UK

It is clear new bus lanes are not a realistic answer for London's transport problems. The authorities should instead create a modern rapid tram network. It could be the 'grand' scheme of transport investment the capital needs and bring an end to the tinkering and taxing we've seen so far.
Andrew Wyatt, UK

Here's a revolutionary concept - a huge cash injection into public transport to improve the rail network and reduce the cost of rail travel to a more acceptable level. In most of Europe, rail travel is less than half the cost of a similar journey here.

Scrap road tax for cars and raise tax on fuel. That way the more you use the road, the more you pay. Maybe then car usage will drop.
Sheila, UK

Crowded roads filled with angry drivers do not make for good cycling conditions, so it is hardly surprising that cycling reduces year on year.

David Hembrow, UK
I travelled from Kent to London today, on eight miles of uneven and pot-holed roads. Then I boarded a dirty, draughty, slam-door train to Cannon Street (not Charing Cross because it was closed).

Since the Tube's Central Line is still closed, I took a more tortuous route with two changes, plus a breakdown.

The whole rail and road system in the South-East is a nightmare.

Instead of trying to sort out the world's problems, Tony Blair should spend some quality time sorting out our problems and, delivering on his promises.
Paul Huxstep, England

That "transport policy is failing" isn't exactly news to most of the public, and clearly is not a priority for this government, which has fobbed us off by putting 4th Division players in charge.

The fundamental issue is that demand for transportation is higher than supply - and the result is overcrowding on road and rail. Only a re-examination of the policies which affect where we work, where we shop, and where we live, can make a difference to this demand.
Laurence Southon, UK

I think the issue should be put in the hands of a cross-party group and dealt with as a national emergency

Ian Simpson, USA
More crowded roads filled with more angry drivers do not make for good cycling conditions, so it is hardly surprising that cycling reduces year on year. Given that most people who give up cycling end up driving a car, this only makes congestion, pollution and the death rates on our roads worse.
David Hembrow, UK

British transport planning is too dependent on the electability of the politicians in power. They want a solution, but run scared over the cost. The system is in meltdown and cannot be left to the private sector to save alone. I think the issue should be put in the hands of a cross-party group and dealt with as a national emergency. Any politician who makes transport policy a political football is really being dishonest and is playing with the well-being of the nation.
Ian Simpson, USA

Never mind reducing car use in London, how is the present system of transport in the capital going to cope with the extra passengers? Even now public transport in London is overcrowded and overpriced as well as unreliable.

I suggest those in charge should get real and try London transport on a daily basis. It's sheer hell, but nobody is prepared to do anything about it. We are one of the biggest capitals in the world and should have a transport system to match or it will have an adverse effect on the city that I live in and love.
J Sorrentino, UK

Sack - yes sack - all incompetent politicians associated with transport.

John Elton, England
I may not agree with everything Ken Livingstone does, but at least he is trying something concrete to improve London's transport. That's much better than palming off responsibility to a greedy, irresponsible, private sector, after which the taxpayer forks out millions to sort things out.
SR Marshall, England

Promises, promises. Typical politicians, they're elected, but only want an easy life. Trouble is they cannot admit their failures, hold their head in shame and resign. What are needed are decisive solutions:
1) Stop producing cars that continue to congest the roads.
2) Get everyone to become employed locally.
3) Create tax incentives to allow people to work from home.
4) Stop creating policies that only provide revenue to the treasury, for example - congestion charging and petrol tax. This means more use is more income for the government.
5) Sack - yes sack - all incompetent politicians associated with transport. I expect there to be many vacancies.
John Elton, England

Yes, trains are delayed, but only occasionally

Will O'Malley, UK, England
The programme seemed to trumpet road charging as something wonderful that the government is too afraid to implement. The simple fact is that until we have a reliable, affordable public transport system, any road charging would simply become an extra tax for the millions of people who currently have no other alternative to the car.

What we need to do is build more roads in the short term to solve our chronic congestion, but meanwhile build a fast rail network.
Chris Jones, UK

As a regular commuter to Manchester, I could not relate to Panorama's portrayal of the railway network. Yes, trains are delayed, but only occasionally.

The programme raised some interesting points (no pun intended) but ultimately it was highly selective in the figures used, and created an image of the rail and bus network (which I also use with little hindrance) that bears no relation to my experience as a commuter.
Will O'Malley, UK, England

A wonderful programme. It is totally true that this government has criminally failed to confront the car lobby. They prefer to stay in bed with the car, oil, and road construction companies. To be environmental and support Ken Livingstone is not fashionable it seems.
Oliver Khan, UK

It is currently good to put down the privatisation of railways, but do let's remember how bad British Rail was

John Whitby, England
It is ridiculous to say the government is keeping its transport promises when it does not make adequate provision for disabled people.

Even the buses that are supposed to be wheelchair friendly cannot be accessed by a wheelchair user independently. Also travelling in the guard's van on some train routes is not an integrated transport system, integrated means integrating all people including people with a disability.
Peter Budgen, UK

It is currently good to put down the privatisation of railways, but do let's remember how bad British Rail was, and that the private companies have managed a major increase in use, both of freight and passengers.

But they are still running on the old, rundown system that British Rail left behind. If you push a quart into a pint pot it will always overflow.
John Whitby, England

New Labour has not delivered it's promises on transport, and as I see it, it is not likely to. They have totally underestimated what it will take to rectify the many problems with the whole transport system.

The government derives too much tax revenue from we motorists. Revenue it can't afford to lose.

Andrew Pittman, UK
If the government wants to cut car usage, it's going to have to fund a reliable, affordable public transport system.
Steve Fuller, England

The reason the government won't take on the car lobby is simple - it derives too much tax revenue from we motorists. Revenue it can't afford to lose.
Andrew Pittman, UK

Congestion is caused by commuters. Twenty years ago, the average commute was about four miles. But because today people travel further to their place of work, the car, train and bus has become more necessary. What we need is more employment close to residential areas.
Allen Pullen, England

It should have been a two-hour programme, maybe even 24 hours or a whole series. I think the problem is that we have grown used to travelling and working all over the place and using all transport modes. There is now so much more disposable income that it has been natural for people to expect everyone to own a car.
John Malet-Bates, UK

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