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EDITIONS
Panorama
History
The precise origins of the Jockey Club are not known, but the first evidence of its existence came in 1752.

But far from having any noble intentions, it was actually set up as a social club for the horse racing fraternity.

The club numbered some of the most wealthy and influential men in both in the sport and in the country among its members, and so quickly gained an air of authority.

The Jockey Club did not waste any time though. Before the end of 1752, it founded its first ever 'headquarters'.

Reputable

This came in the form of 'The Coffee Room', built in Newmarket as a meeting place for members only.

Despite having a meeting place and a definite existence, the Jockey Club did not publish its first official list of members until 1835.

But by this time, the organisation had already established a reputable standing within the sport.

In 1757, a dispute over a race at the Curragh was referred to the Jockey Club and the following year, it issued its first ever authoritative order, although it only truly had power within Newmarket.

Uniformity

It wasn't long before the group became a standard bearer for horse racing, and in 1784, its growing influence was obvious when it sent a delegation to see the Prime Minister after the prospect of an increase in racing tax was mooted.

The Club gave it's first 'warning off' notice in 1821, when it banned a well known tout from the parts of Newmarket heath which was occupied by Jockey Club members.

The first move to a universal regulatory body came in 1832, when the organisation issued a notice recommending that other racecourses follow their rules, in the interests of uniformity.

This announcement had the idea of uniting the racing world under one body.

By 1816, the Jockey Club, which surprisingly still had no power outside of Newmarket expressed a willingness to help settle racing disputes if called upon.

Politics

Since then, its affairs were conducted by three Stewards until the Jockey Club combined with the National Hunt Committee in 1968.

The Jockey Club's responsibilities had always been about forming and applying the Rules of Racing as well as licensing individuals and racecourses.

But as politics became a more important factor in the sport, the Jockey Club put forward plans for a separate racing authority.

Two proposals in the past 30 years were rejected, but in 1992, the formation of a British Horseracing Board were given the green light.

The BHB came into existence in June 1993.


The Investigation

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The Jockey Club




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