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Panorama Friday, 1 March, 2002, 14:23 GMT
You quizzed our experts on ASBOs
ASBOs were introduced by the government to fight yob behaviour
Former Home Office minister Mike O'Brien and Director of Liberty John Wadham answered your questions about Anti-Social Behaviour Orders (ASBOs).

To watch a recording of the forum select the link below:

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ASBOs can ban young offenders from their community and are one of the most radical crime measures to be introduced by this government.

Many welcome ASBOs as a means of protecting vulnerable communities but some groups are worried the controversial orders may contravene human rights legislation.

Human rights groups are particularly worried about the use of hearsay evidence - where a witness can make accusations anonymously - and the practice of "naming and shaming" the accused in newspapers.

How else can we protect communities from troublesome individuals? Are ASBOs an abuse of human rights? Should local councils have the power to ban individuals from their community?

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Panorama followed David Young, who was given an Anti-Social Behaviour Order (ASBO)



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