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EDITIONS
Panorama Sunday, 20 May, 2001, 21:09 GMT 22:09 UK
Your comments on Not Cricket!
Not Cricket!


If anyone tried to bribe Zinedine Zidane, Rivaldo or even Roy Keane to throw a match, how much would they have to pay them? All of a sudden US$25,000 doesn't seem so much. Is the real issue greedy players? If it is then you have three options - 1) Pay them more (which would sadly mean the advent of test, one day and county cricket on the nation's screens daily to bring up the tv revenue - wouldn't that be a shame!) 2) Pay them less (it is a gentleman's sport after all!) 3) Leave it up to a vacillating International Cricket Council to declare that there is no significant problem, despite Beefy's clear statement that there is a real issue with this even today. Maybe I'm not the only guy in England who wants us to win the Ashes back fairly...will it happen?
Steve Coe
Harrogate

Although I played cricket at school until my son showed a particular aptitude for the game I never "loved" it. I would like to explore the corruption and nepotism associated with the selection and training of young players at junior level.
Paul Hope
Stockport

I watched the programme and thought it was a disgrace for the South African cricketers to even think about doing anything that might harm the game's honour is shocking. I think any offender who is caught should be named and shamed no matter how famous or rich. It's ruining a brilliant game which I love. It also harms the image of the genuine hard playing players. Your programme was a much needed reminder to the ICC to improve things and stamp this out.
Gareth
Greenock

What about the umpires? There was no mention of them at all in the programme yet they are in the best place to affect the outcome of a match. Some of their decisions last year should call them in question at least!
Raymond
Aberdeen

In response to the edition of Panorama detailing corruption in cricket, I would like to address the programme's willingness to direct the corruption towards Sharjah, SA and India. In particular, the programme mentioned that Coca-Cola had pulled out of sponsoring the latest tournament at Sharjah. Additionally, the programme asked why the ICC were recognising the one day matches played there. Now surely, as the programme indicated, corruption in cricket is much larger than at first anticipated and even the England cricket team is not immune from it. Bearing this in mind, should the forthcoming triangular one day tournament in England not be subject to scrutiny?
Abs Jawaid
Cambridge

The not cricket programme ignores the fact that Australia cricketers have been found of involvement in giving information to bookmakers, but the ACB kept quiet for years, now top Australians are in charge of running the ICC, where is the credibility?
Asif
London

Why didn't the Panorama team point the finger at any of the English players, surely there are some who have taken a bribe here and there, as we all know, our cricketers were poorly paid for many years and the temptation must have been great to earn a few more bucks by giving information about games coming up, or even throwing some matches. I don't believe, as a nation, all our sportsman are completely innocent of any dealings with the underworld, that would be naive.
Paul
London

To help solve the problem of Match fixing, I believe that the ICC have to be consistent in what they do. For example, certain players have been banned for life or have been fined and suspended for x amount of matches e.g. Herschelle Gibbs, Salim Malik & Azharrudin. But, why has there been no action taken against Mark Waugh, Tim May (retired), Shane Warne & Alec Stewart because They are all involved as well.
Ross Whatmore
Middlesbrough

Your so called report on match fixing really made my blood boil. It was so pro-England and anti-SA and India, it was pathetic! How you can call it a report is beyond me, it was bias! I think that the report was very harsh on Hansie Cronje and I for one won't stand for it! You pommies should stop shifting the blame and take responsibility for things! You all look like fools to the rest of the world anyway! Stop being so narrow minded and look at yourselves, everyone makes mistakes. Hansie has exposed the corrupt side of cricket, we should be thanking him and stop insulting him. Whoever says Hansie Cronje ruined the game of cricket knows nothing about him or the game.
Tandi
Surrey

Why does Ian Botham not help, in real terms, the effort to stamp out corruption in his sport? He is of my own age, and has been, until now, my hero as far as the game is concerned! I do go to & host cricket "days" at Old Trafford, but I must admit, I will not be taking my youngest again if it is not sorted out.
Stephen
North West

In addition to the damage to a great game there is the damage to the punter's wallet! The old adage is "never bet on anything that can talk", well proved by this dreadful affair.
Guy Cole
Selsey

I can confirm to yourselves that matchfixing is still going on. If you look into the game now most players have to take bribes just so they can get into the team and play. India is trying to clean up the act but a few names are being bribed. The game has come into disgrace, this is when money takes control of cricketers. The ICC must look into this issue more. The game needs to be saved - its in crisis.
S Singh
London

Having just watched Panorama on the back of an extraordinary day's play from Lord's when 15 Pakistani wickets fell, one is almost afraid to ask whether it is possible that other forces have been at work today.
Derek
Nottingham

I notice that in all this furore and talk of large sums of money there have been no British bookmakers mentioned. Perhaps that is because bookmaking in Britain is legal, and legally controlled. Perhaps the real answer is to legalise and control bookmaking in the countries where the corrupt offers are coming from, and take bookmaking out of the hands of criminals.
Gavin Coles
Cardiff

A remarkably revelation-free edition of Panorama. I don't believe that there was anything on that programme that couldn't have been gleaned from a site like CricInfo or the archives of any decent newspaper.
Mike Whitaker
Peterborough

Links to more Panorama stories are at the foot of the page.


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