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Last Updated: Monday, 4 June 2007, 14:16 GMT 15:16 UK
Calculating crime and its perception
A policeman
More or Less
Monday, 4 June, 2007
BBC Radio 4, 1630 BST

Why do people not believe crime statistics?

In More or Less this week, Andrew Dilnot and the team examined a clash of perceptions and numbers.

They talked to those convinced of a crime epidemic, together with those asked for ways of restoring trust. Can it be done?

Part of the problem seems to be that crime figures are an aggregate for the whole country, when there can be wide variations in particular places, which mean that the country-wide figures may not correspond with people's local experience.

We looked at how this insight might just explain why people see crime differently, and what it implies about what to do about it.

Ill winds

Also in the programme, reasons why the wind-chill factor may not add up and how the originator of it in the United Kingdom is feeling penitent.

Find out why, if you want it to work for you, you need to be five foot tall, a little overweight, out at night, and more.

And there is that modern piece of business speak "the 800 lb gorilla". How heavy is a gorilla really?

Plus some more news to qualify talk of a pensions crisis, and what private companies do not like about the deluge of data now available to them about the rest of us.

Presenter: Andrew Dilnot
Producer: Michael Blastland

BBC Radio 4's More or Less was broadcast on Monday, 4 June, 2007 at 1630 BST.


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