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Have Your Say: Redundancy

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The number of people out of work in the UK reached 2.261 million in the three months to April according to the Office for National Statistics.

Every week more than 23,000 people are made redundant. It's the highest number since records began in 1995.

Some employers are trying to avoid redundancy by proposing pay cuts or extended unpaid leave. This week British Airways asked 30,000 employees to consider working for nothing for up to a month to help the company through tough times.

Have you been asked to take a pay cut, freeze or reduce your hours?

Are you feeling under pressure?

Do you have to meet your employers demands?

Should employees accept cut backs to secure their job?

Are you aware of your rights?

What are your experiences and views?

We asked for your comments, a selection of which are below. This debate is now closed.

MOST RECENT COMMENTS

I have been asked to take a permanent pay cut of 10 percent.

I can't really afford it, but I used the government right to request flexible working to negotiate a work-from-home clause in my contract.

One day we heard that our colleagues in the US had been forced to take a 10 percent pay cut. Next day there was a meeting in London informing us that the company was requesting the same from UK-based employees.

It took a while, but eventually the company agreed to allow me to work from home 4 days/week. In return I agreed to take the pay cut.

Although the company has suffered a big drop in income, our little bit of the organisation remains in profit.

Meanwhile the directors are like Members of Parliament, putting in big expense claims and flying business class and staying in smart hotels.

The overall result has been counter-productive for the company. Morale is now very low. People leave on time, instead of working extra hours. My boss has become slipshod and careless.

A lose-lose situation all round. How could they have done it better? Told us about the financial position of the company. Not done a 10% across, the board, but had higher-paid employees taking a bigger cut. Imposing a blanket ban on business class travel; asking employees how we can save money through operations, and giving employees a share of the saving.
David,London

Whereas I would love to agree with your expert that redundancy is based on past performance and not length of service, age, race, sex or sexual orientation, I think in reality this is not necessarily the case. In organisations where performance measures miss the mark and appraisals are random at best it is very easy for performance to be manipulated on paper and for the ranks to close and protect established networks
Anonymous

Your item hardly touched on the current situation at my work place. 25% drop in hours for everyone! A reality believe me, minimum wage staff can not be asked to reduce costs in any other way when manufacturing needs to retain skills in preparation for the 'green shoots'. Talk of preserving pension rights and £30,000 tax free 'lumps' would be laughable if they were not plain disgusting to the likes of me and my colleagues. We actually make and export something given a chance. Many of us can not even get help through tax credit or council tax benefit. Try talking about the other end of the scale please.
Lesley, Somerset


The comments we publish are not necessarily the views of the BBC but will reflect the balance of views we have received. It is helpful if contributors state if they work for any organisation relevant to an issue discussed. Readers should form their own views on whether messages published represent undeclared interests, or views prompted by a common source.





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