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Last Updated: Tuesday, 7 October, 2003, 11:37 GMT 12:37 UK
Iraq: Scott Ritter
Scott Ritter
Scott Ritter has been very critical of the motives for war in Iraq.

In a HARDtalk interview on 6 October, David Jessel spoke to former UN weapons inspector Scott Ritter about the latest report on weapons on mass destruction in Iraq.

The Iraq Survey Group (ISG) has reported that after months of searching it has found Iraq had an intent to produce weapons of mass destruction at some point in the future.

No weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) have been found in Iraq since Saddam Hussein was removed from power.

The best thing for the United States, for Great Britain, for the world is to get a properly mandated United Nations inspection team back to Iraq
Scott Ritter

David Kay, who released the ISG report, says it is too early to say whether WMDs "do not exist or that they existed before the war".

He says his Iraq Survey Group has uncovered evidence of banned activities which the United Nations and pre-war intelligence had not known about, including 24 clandestine laboratories and four missile programmes.

Where is the evidence?

However, former United Nations weapons inspector Scott Ritter, who was opposed to the war in Iraq, says he wants to see more details of what the group has found.

He says the group's findings do not support President Bush's case for war - that Iraq presented a threat.

Mr Ritter says between 90 to 95 percent of WMDs had been accounted for by the United Nations.

He says it is not know what happened to the other five percent, however he says there is yet to be evidence to prove Iraq posed a present threat:

"We know we had no information that suggested it was still in existence."

Outspoken critic

Mr Ritter was a weapons inspector until 1998, when he resigned his job accusing the Security Council and the United States of caving in to the Iraqis.

Since then he has been the most outspoken critic of US policy towards Baghdad.

He says the United Nations should be sent back to the country to continue its work.

"The best thing for the United States, for Great Britain, for the world is to get a properly mandated United Nations inspection team back to Iraq."

HARDtalk can be seen on BBC World at 03:30 GMT, 08:30 GMT, 11:30 GMT, 15:30 GMT, 18:30 GMT and 22:30 GMT

It can also be seen on BBC News 24 at 03:30 and 23:30



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