BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Programmes: Correspondent  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Correspondent Sunday, 20 July, 2003, 20:30 GMT 21:30 UK
Read your comments
Father and son: Kim Il-sung & Kim Jong-il
Kim Jong-il (r) was not expected to succeed his father
Correspondent: The Real Dr Evil was broadcast on BBC Two on Sunday, 20 July, 2003 at 1915 BST.

Have your say

Because of the high volume of correspondence we receive, we cannot guarantee to publish every single e-mail.


I was struck by several of your remarks about Kim Jong-il as uncannily applicable to another well-known world leader.

"Kim Jong-il (George W Bush) was not expected to succeed his father"; "We watched Kim (George) develop from a lazy student to tough-talking nuclear brinksman"; "With Saddam Hussein gone, Jong-il (Bush) is regarded as the world's most dangerous man".
Gene Fisher, USA

I think the media is failing by making programmes like this. It is a fact that the USA has over 20,000 nuclear warheads and it is the only country to ever have used them in war. The USA has invaded or 'intervened' into more countries since WWII, then any other.

All of this, and you expect us to get worried when N Korea may or may not have a couple of nukes. When you talk of exposing the ills of propaganda in N Korea you are spreading propaganda for the bigger threat, by ignoring the problem of the USA, a country that has done the most to bring the world into a nuclear war.
Tom, England

Kim Jong-il was condemned by those who know him best, not by any Western power. If anything, these people are more scathing than the most gung-ho Americans. We must also remember that the West may want to liberate the enslaved peoples of the DPRK, but lets face it, China holds sway and they're not much better than N Korea.
James Stubbs, UK

The programme talked about state sponsored terrorism, threatening of other nations, and a love of nuclear weaponry. How interesting that Kim Jong-il, George Bush and Donald Rumsfeld were all present.
Gordon, UK

As a South Korean I believe that N Korea is very dangerous and ruthless like a child who is in front of oil with matches. Therefore, the international society must take any further action to them as soon as possible. However, this programme could have focused on the relationship between the USA and N Korea. There could be lots of perspectives to be discussed seriously before thinking about N Korea just as a dangerous country with Mr Evil.
Lee Jeong-eun, South Korea

Congratulations for producing this very exposing programme about one of the world's most secretive regime. Historical events till this day have shown Kim Jong-il to be a highly unstable and violent dictator. Despite the fact that the UN and the world community are calling for rapid action to handle North Korea's nuclear standoff, the US and UK are unwilling to seriously confront Kim Jong-il. When the UN and the rest of the world however do not consider a country as Iraq to be an imminent threat to world peace and suggest containment, the US and the UK go to war. If the North Korean people had oil flowing underneath their feet they would have been liberated a long time ago.
Gregory Roumeliotis, UK

What has happened to the German economy post-unification is much in the minds of South Koreans

Michael Houser
I recently returned from a research visit to South Korea, during which I was surprised to find that most South Koreans take it as given that Kim Jong Il murdered his father ... and that because of the devastation he has wrought in the North, no longer regards reunification as desirable. What has happened to the German economy post-unification is much in the minds of South Koreans, who regard the North as in a far, far worse state than former East Germany.
Michael Houser, United Kingdom

I was at a meeting at the SHAPE headquarters in Brussels in the 1980s. An American diplomat and military man explained that undermining the communist bloc economically, including the deprivation of basic food stuffs, with as a consequence massive food shortages, was the name of the game and one of the main avenues of attack for NATO in debilitating the Communist bloc. The signs are that every attempt has been made to debilitate North Korea in the same way, and that this may have left the North Korean regime with stark choices - between maintaining a credible military deterrent, with strong popular control, and a state which had effectively succumbed to American authority.
Julian Fitzgerald, Leeds

A country's history defines its cultural outlook today, that is true of any nation.

Adrian Howden
I think the situation is so serious; the leaders of Russia, China & the U.S should threaten a non-nuclear pre-emptive strike if Kim Jong-il cannot be persuaded by peaceful means to stop the nuclear development. Only as an absolute last resort should a pre-emptive nuclear strike be considered and then only by the three nations acting in concert.
Chris Butcher, U.K

To understand the DPRK's attitude towards the west is to understand the long history it (and the south's) has had fighting imperialist outsiders. A country's history defines its cultural outlook today, that is true of any nation.

The program mentioned Kim Jong Il's "complete control", tell me which recent leader led its country into war with over 70% of the population against it? A dictator perhaps? Why did the program not mention the Agreed Framework signed by Mrs Albright and Kim Jong Il, in which they agreed that the out of date nuclear facilities in the DPRK which power the nation would be replaced by the US by 2003. Why did it not mention that the only reason that talks have broken down between the DPRK and the US is the stupid speech presented by George Bush that coupled the DPRK with the "axis of evil". This speech deeply offended the DPRK because along with signing the Agreed Framework, they had also signed around 15 international anti-terrorist agreements.
Adrian Howden

I have to say that having worked for a Korean company for the last 5 years that it is typical of Korean culture to lie and deceive so that they can try and control people. As far as I am personally concerned, after the experience I have had with Korean people whether it be north or south, they are after their own ends and will stop at nothing to get there.
Gareth Thomas, Wales

It is not surprising the fact that you give the "Dr Evil" name to the N. Korean President. This is the art of propaganda. The same happened with Sl. Milosevitch and Saddam before war erupted against their countries. Don't worry. Empires fall, this is history.
Aris Aristou, Historian, Middlesex

It is so rare to catch a glimpse of anything of life in North Korea, the depth of this programme was astonishing

Justin Young
After seeing your programme on Kim Jong Il of North Korea, the question arises whether this has been the start of a campaign to rally your viewers in the UK and Europe in support of the next questionable war .
Sjoerd van Driel, The Netherlands

I think that Dr Evil should be taken very seriously up to the point of declaring war to North Korea, as it was done for Saddam Hussein
Eugenia Rosaspina, Italy

As a student I spent some time in South Korea and have very fond feelings toward the Korean people. Your programme was one of the most fascinating pieces of viewing I have had the good fortune of watching in recent years. Fantastically researched and well balanced, I was glued to my screen. It is so rare to catch a glimpse of anything of life in North Korea, the depth of this programme was astonishing and enlightening. I found myself deeply moved. Thank you very much.
Justin Young, UK

Send us your comments:

Name:


Your E-mail address:


Country:


Comments:


Disclaimer: The BBC will put up as many of your comments as possible but we cannot guarantee that all e-mails will be published. The BBC reserves the right to edit comments that are published.

Links to more Correspondent stories are at the foot of the page.


 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Correspondent stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes