[an error occurred while processing this directive]
BBC News
watch One-Minute World News
Last Updated: Friday, 27 January 2006, 16:15 GMT
ClickBack
Click's regular feedback slot allows you to have your say on issues mentioned in the programme and other technology matters.

Richard Taylor recently investigated censorship of the web in China. This item stirred up quite a lot of controversy among you and as a result many of you sent us e-mails.

Nick sent us this:

"I inadvertently got a friend in hot water with the authorities in China. We were trading e-mails about what we see as immoral and illegal behaviour by countries like the USA and the UK.

I was a little bit too stupid to catch my friend's subtle hints to go easy and he soon ended up before a peoples' committee to explain his "revolutionary", anti-establishment e-mails. They had printed copies of the offending e-mails from his webmail account even though the mails were TO him, not FROM him.

He finally got out of trouble when he pointed out the e-mails were about the USA not China. You may wish to warn your viewers that even visitors to China should avoid even opening or downloading e-mails that could risk offending local authorities."

Scary stuff. And we had this article from Chris:

"After watching your article about 'the great firewall of China' I have to say I couldn't agree more. I myself have lived in China for several months and, being an avid internet user, found the restrictions surprising to say the least. listing websites of 'web proxy avoidance' is all very well but most of the most well known websites are blocked in China.

I personally used a less well known, but effective, tool called UltraSurf. I would like to see this information mentioned so that people travelling to China, and Chinese citizens, can enjoy unrestricted internet access."


On a separate note, Russell Croft, from Hertfordshire, UK, contacted us to say:

"The plural of mouse is mice NOT mices or mouses - for goodness sakes."

According to rumour, up until the late 1980s even Microsoft were OK with the word "mouses"; perhaps an indicator that they should stick to operating systems and not dictionaries.



SEE ALSO:
The great firewall of China
06 Jan 06 |  Click


PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific