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Sunday, 6 October, 2002, 14:41 GMT 15:41 UK
Sunday 29 September 2002
pa
Tony Blair, Prime Minister

Sunday 29th September 2002

On the morning of the opening of the Labour Party conference in Blackpool, Sir David interviewed the Prime Minister Tony Blair.

Mr Blair told Sir David that he was confident the United Nations would agree a resolution telling Saddam Hussein to disarm Iraq's weapons of mass destruction or face the consequences. But he refused to rule out the possibility that Britain might have to go it alone and join the United States in an attack on Iraq if Saddam Hussein was not disarmed by weapons inspectors.

He said: 'The key to this is that the United Nations has to be the way of dealing with this. We are going down the UN route but the UN route has to be the way of dealing with it not avoiding it.'

He added: 'I hope Saddam can be forced by international pressure, but if not then we have to be prepared as an international commmunity to force him to do it the other way.'

The Prime Minister confirmed that Prince Charles writes to him occaisionally but he had `no problem at all' with Prince Charles expressing his views.

Mr Blair also refused to rule out the possibility of a referendum on Britain joining the single currency this side of the election - provided the Chancellor's five economic tests were met. He said there was no reason why any potential conflict with Iraq should delay a referendum.

He was also joined by Scott Ritter, a former inspector of Iraqi weapons - who said that so far, the United States and Britain had failed to make an adequate case for war against Iraq. Christopher Reeve, the former actor, also spoke to Sir David about his struggles to regain movement following a riding accident in 1995. He said if President Bush didn't re-evaluate his administration's policy on stem cell research, he would leave America and come to live in Britain.

And to round up the news and views of the Sunday papers, Sir David was joined by Rachel Sylvester from the Daily Telegraph and Michael Brown from the Independent.

Tony Blair MP, Prime Minister

Scott Ritter, former UN weapons inspector

Christopher Reeve, former actor


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