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EDITIONS
Wednesday, 27 November, 2002, 16:29 GMT
World Trade Centre attacks anniversary
US Secretary of State, Colin Powell
US Secretary of State, Colin Powell

Sunday 8th September 2002

On his first show after an extended summer break, Sir David Frost brought us a special edition of Breakfast with Frost to mark the forthcoming anniversary of the World Trade Centre attacks on September 11th 2001.

In his only European television interview, The US Secretary of State Colin Powell told Sir David that the West just didn't know how long it would take Saddam Hussein to develop nuclear weapons - anything between one to nine years. He also said that Iraq is a far weaker state than it was when America last attacked twelve years ago. "With respect to nuclear", he said, "when we were able to get into Iraq with the inspectors, they (the Iraqis) were further along than we had thought. And so you can debate whether it is one year, five years or nine years - the important point is that they are still committed to pursuing that technology."

US Secretary of State Colin Powell

Former Mayor of New York Rudy Guiliani recalled the morning of the attack and what he saw as he raced to the scene to co-ordinate the response of the emergency services.

Rudy Giuliani, former Mayor of New York

The current Police Commissioner Raymond W Kelly talked about how the rehabilitation of his force one year on, and how the city is preparing for the possibility of another attack. New Yorkers' 'really feel that they're on a mission' he said.

Raymond W Kelly, Police Commissioner, New York City

The Chief Executive of British Airways, Rod Eddington, admitted that BA was close to 'meltdown' after September 11th. He said that a future war with Iraq would hurt the company badly and conceded that it was quite possible that BA would drop out of the FTSE next week...but claimed his company was in a robust state and said..."if we do fall out this time, we will come back".

Rod Eddington, Chief Executive, British Airways

Evidence for action on Iraq was questioned by the Father of the House of Commons, Tam Dalyell, who joined Sir David at the end of the programme. Commenting on Tony Blair's words after meeting with President Bush, Dalyell said it was 'nonsense' that the Prime Minister had used Afghanistan and Kosovo as examples of successful action by the international community. He added that it was 'important that American opinion should know the diversity of opinion in the British Parliament' he added, calling for an early recall.

Tam Dalyell MP, Father of the House

The BBC's correspondent Stephen Evans gave an eyewitness account of his experiences from within the World trade centre on September 11th, and spoke of its impact on the people of New York. 'I think most people assume that another attack will happen' he said.

Stephen Evans, North American Business Correspondent

The question of action in Iraq also dominated our paper review with Baroness Emma Nicholson, leader of the European Parliament's South Iraqi Marshes Project, Broadcaster Michael Cockerell and Warren Hoge, chief of the New York Times London bureau.


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