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EDITIONS
Sunday, 18 August, 2002, 14:00 GMT 15:00 UK
Dave Gorman, Comedian
Comedian, Dave Gorman
Comedian, Dave Gorman
BBC BREAKFAST WITH FROST
HOSTED BY HUW EDWARDS
INTERVIEW:
DAVE GORMAN, COMEDIAN
AUGUST 18TH, 2002

Please note "BBC Breakfast with Frost" must be credited if any part of this transcript is used

HUW EDWARDS:
Dave is one of the judges at the open mic competition at Edinburgh this year. But I'm pleased to say, he's dropped into the studio here this morning. Dave welcome.

DAVE GORMAN:
Thank you very much. Thanks for having me.

HUW EDWARDS:
Why is Edinburgh such a big thing? Lots of people think it's a fairly trendy kind of thing that you're meant to like but it's not genuinely very funny.

DAVE GORMAN:
Like most art, most comedy is terrible. Most theatre's terrible, most art is terrible, most television is terrible but there is always some good stuff in there as well. And from a lot of comics' point of view the reason that the festival's so good is because the lazy television industry, rather than going and seeing you in Islington where they live, travels to Edinburgh en masse and starts looking for the new thing.

HUW EDWARDS:
It's always written about in terms of a launch pad and a good springboard and all these phrases are used. Is that true?

DAVE GORMAN:
It can be. The clip that you've just showed was from a TV show that came about because I was doing a stage show about that story and that was seen in Edinburgh and then it moved to the West End and then it moved onto TV. So that came about through the Edinburgh Festival, without it that wouldn't have happened. So for me yeah.

HUW EDWARDS:
And for others.

DAVE GORMAN:
It happens all the times for others - Rich Hall who you mentioned earlier - again has been very, very successful in Edinburgh and that's led to lots of others things. It's almost because they're such a concentration and because there is so much and the cream rises to the top. So yeah, there's loads of terrible, terrible things but there's also some fantastic things and it's really worth seeking out.

My personal view when I go to Edinburgh is always to make sure I see a few people I've never heard of and accept the terrible things that come out of that because they're be a great surprise in it as well.

HUW EDWARDS:
Of course! I mean the magic is the new material isn't it? People's imagination, people originality and that's the kind of rich look into the world of other people's imagination.

DAVE GORMAN:
Absolutely. People also - they forget - because so much of the media focus on Edinburgh is about the comedy. It's an arts festival. There's a film festival, there's a jazz festival. There's theatre, there's dance, there's puppetry, there's kids' shows, there's everything. I always go and see some of everything when I'm up there as well. Because if you just watch comedy - four shows a day for a month - of course it's going to start appearing terrible.

HUW EDWARDS:
I talk about new material. How do you go about - you imagine comedians sitting down in a room thinking what am I going to write about, what am I going to say, how am I going to find sort of funny things. What do you do to gather new material?

DAVE GORMAN:
Personally now I make shows about my real life and I go on a six month adventure in order to have a story to tell. So that the new thing is - I've obeyed my horoscopes for 40 days and 40 nights and that generates material automatically.

HUW EDWARDS:
Give us an example.

DAVE GORMAN:
Well I've made a horse into a unicorn, I've had my colon cleaned.

HUW EDWARDS:
That was in your horoscope was it?

DAVE GORMAN:
That was in my horoscope.

HUW EDWARDS:
It said go and have your colon cleaned?

DAVE GORMAN:
Words to that effect.

HUW EDWARDS:
Really.

DAVE GORMAN:
One horoscope genuinely told me to stand on one leg in a bucket, peeling a tangerine, while holding a bowl of cereal in my hand. And I promise you that's a word-for-word translation from a national newspaper horoscope.

HUW EDWARDS:
Really.

DAVE GORMAN:
Yes. You can't be funnier than what some of the astrologers were writing actually. You just have to take it at face value and go with it.

HUW EDWARDS:
You're judging - how difficult is it to judge?

DAVE GORMAN:
The judges are there and we're all fans of comedy. There are four of us judging it. We're just like the rest of the audience. Everyone goes out with an opinion about who they like most on any show. So that's what we're going to do. We're going to sit there, we're going to laugh at who we find funny. We're going to talk about it and then we're going to come to a conclusion. There is no fair way of doing it.

HUW EDWARDS:
Do you have a view on swearing? I mean, Barry Cryer was quite heavy-handed this week when he said - look, all these young guys or young women - they come along and actually what they think is funny is just the f-word or just swearing. Is there an over dependence on it?

DAVE GORMAN:
There can be. And Barry is a mate of mine and I've heard Barry swear at 1 o'clock in the morning on many, many occasions - he's not an angel himself. I think the point is you can over-rely on it - like Billy Connolly - and I think Barry used this - if you take the full interview that that came from, Barry referred to Billy Connolly as a perfect example of how to swear and it can be used absolutely correctly and it can be used lazily. But the fact that we're criticising that means that if we were in the audience we wouldn't be laughing at that.

HUW EDWARDS:
His point was that actually for lots of up and coming comedians it is their main vehicle and it shouldn't be.

DAVE GORMAN:
If it is the main way you're going to get laughs then you're not going to get laughs. There isn't a successful comic in the world whose punch line is only swearing. No one has succeeded through that route yet and I don't see how it's going to suddenly turn round and become a successful route now. You can dismiss comics for doing that but actually if audiences are laughing at that then audiences are wrong and it comes down to them as well obviously.

HUW EDWARDS:
We talked about new material and we are talking about you at Edinburgh. I am not going to ask you to repeat your horoscope because I dread what might come next. But what other projects have you got coming up?

DAVE GORMAN:
I'm touring in October, November, December. But the TV show which is based on my horoscopes comes out at the beginning of September as well.

HUW EDWARDS:
Not every item surely? Not every item in the horoscope in the TV series?

DAVE GORMAN:
Yes.

HUW EDWARDS:
I believe that's enough.

DAVE GORMAN:
Absolutely - it is Sunday morning.

HUW EDWARDS:
If we had a television of that it would be triple X rated.

DAVE GORMAN:
It's clean, I promise you.

HUW EDWARDS:
Thank you very much Dave.

DAVE GORMAN:
Much like my colon.


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